Convict women on the Friends


Names as they appear on the Transportation Register.  This list also includes Elizabeth Ward who was on board the Friends but was not included in the register.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 18 July 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 20
Sentence: 7 years

Ann was a house servant who was convicted on two charges of theft. She stole 2 yards of lace, 2 ¾ yards of ribbon, a shawl, 2 yards of tape, a trill, 2 pieces of calico, 11 pieces of cloth, 4 caps and 2 half handkerchiefs from Sarah Moore and Jane Mordeace. She also stole two towels, six chains, ¼ yard of muslin, two handkerchiefs, an apron, a brush, a memorandum book and case, and a bonnet. John Robinson owned the Angel Inn at St Martins-le-Grand where Ann lived and worked and the latter items had belonged to his wife and to his gentlemen guests. Sarah and Jane were fellow servants. Ann had taken the goods to a laundrywoman and most of them were recovered there.

A bid was made in court for clemency on the grounds of good character and her youth, and the fact that this was a first offence. The Judge recommended no mercy.

1813 – 31 March, Ann Battson m. Thomas Evans at St Philips, Sydney, Rev William Cowper’s marriage returns, CS, NSWBDM

1828 – Aged 40, with Thos Evans, Philip Street, Sydney CEN

Sources:
Old Bailey(1) – 18 July 1810
Old Bailey (2) – 18 July 1810
The National Archives, Kew, England, HO 47/45/21
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1813, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Northumberland Quarter Sessions, Morpeth, 11 January 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 38
Sentence: 7 years

1814 – Convict, Parramatta, off stores, wife to Abel Simpson, Duke of Portland, TL, labourer M

1819 – 2 July, Ann Simpson, free, aged 47, died, Rev Samuel Marsden’s burial returns, CS, NSWBDM

Despite her death, Ann continued to appear in NSW convict and settler lists until 1821.

Abel Simpson was remarried at the end of 1819 to Ann Thornelly (Thornley), another convict. He was charged with horse stealing in 1824 and initially sentenced to death. He was described at the time as very old and deaf. His sentence was commuted to transportation to a penal settlement for seven years and he was sent to work in government employ at Port Macquarie. CS, Sydney Gazette 1 July and 8 July, 1824

Sources:
CS: Burial return for quarter ended 30 September 1819, St Johns Parramatta, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 21 February 1810
Crime: Coining offences
Age: about 30
Sentence: 14 years

Amelia was convicted of being in possession of forged and counterfeit banknotes. She was convicted and imprisoned in Newgate Gaol to await a transport ship. Amelia was in Newgate with her eight-year old daughter Mary Ann (Marianne) and she said she had two older children who were also entirely dependent on her. Amelia was forced to pawn her clothes to help pay for food in Newgate before the Bank provided her with some support. Both mother and daughter sailed on the Friends. Amelia was caught with John Tyndale alias Tindall who was convicted at the Lent Assizes in Suffolk in March 1810 and who sailed to NSW on the Guildford. Their relationship is unknown; Tyndale was married to another woman. See Mary Ann Bellars

1814 – Amelia Bellares, off stores, lives with T. Street, Windsor M

1819 – Amelia Belleire, Windsor, 1 child M

1820 – Amelia Barford, (with or assigned to) J. Slater, Richmond M

1822 – Amelia Bellaires, TL, wife of T Streets, Sydney, Admiral Gambier, FBS, licensed victualler M

1823 – 17 December, Amelia Belares, free, m. Thomas Street, free, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Samuel Marsden’s marriage returns, CS, NSWBDM

1825 – Wife of Thos Street Sydney M

1826 – Amelia Street, died, aged 46 NSWBDM

Thomas Street remarried in 1827 and in 1828 he was a shop owner at Market and Sussex Street, Sydney.

Amelia’s story is told in more detail in The Girl Who Stole Stockings.

Sources:
Old Bailey 21 February 1810
CS:
Marriage returns for quarter ended 31 December 1823, St Johns Parramatta, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040, 6070
Prisoners’ Letters to the Bank of England 1781 to 1827, edited by Deidre Palk.  This book features letters that Amelia wrote (or had written on her behalf) to the Bank of England pleading for its support. Ms Palk also provided the information about John Tyndale above.

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Sarah Higham

Convicted: Lancaster Quarter Sessions, 17 January 1810
Crime: larceny
Age: about 26 or 28
Sentence: Seven years
Native place: Manchester

In 1805 Sarah Higham alias Sarah Bingham was tried in Lancaster for larceny and sentenced to six months’ imprisonment. In January 1810, she was convicted as Sarah Higham at Salford of stealing money from Samuel Lewis at Manchester. She was described as a single woman of Manchester. Costs for the case were £8 11s. She was also recorded as Sarah Higham in England’s Criminal Register.

1810 – Bill of costs of prosecution of Emelia Bingham alias Amelia Bingham alias Matilda Bingham

1814 – Amelia Bingham, wife to William Wilson, off stores, Sydney. William Wilson, FBS, landholder. M

1822 – Amelia Bingham, FBS, wife to E. Bryan, Sydney. Edward Bryan, life, government servant to A. Martin, Sydney M

1825 – Matilda Bingham, FBS, widow, at Kissing Point M

1828 – Amelia Wilson, aged 42, householder, Kissing Point CEN

1848 – Amelia Wilson died aged 64 NSWBDM

It is not clear by whom “Matilda” was left widowed in 1825. There is no record of a marriage to Wilson, or of his death by 1825.

Sources:
Lancashire Record Office: QSP/2591/94 c1810
Lancaster Gazette and General Advertiser, 
27 January 1810
www.rootschat.com

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Surrey Assizes, 18 August 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: 15 years old
Sentence: 7 years

Caroline was tried with her father Henry, and sisters Mary and Alice. Caroline and Mary were convicted of stealing 15 yards of material from Sharp England, a linen draper in Southwark on 9 April 1810. Henry was convicted of receiving the stolen goods. In church records throughout the 1790s, Henry was recorded as a tanner, but in a petition seeking leniency, Henry was described as a porter/seedsman whose wife had died after a long illness and left him with six surviving children, three of whom had been placed under the care of the parish of Bermondsey (i.e. the Poor House). His late wife Alice had died aged 42 and was buried on 17 October 1806. Caroline and Mary were both sentenced to 7 years’ transportation; Henry was sentenced to 14 years, while the oldest daughter, 21-year old Alice, escaped conviction. Henry, stating that he had been a respectable householder in Southwark for 18 years, petitioned for a pardon on his own behalf. He claimed that he was innocent but his daughters had been seduced into the crime by a “lewd girl” of their own young age. Henry’s petition was successful to the extent that he was not transported. Instead he was sent to a prison hulk where he remained until he eventually received a pardon on 30 January 1813. He died a few years later, and was buried on 11 October 1816. Caroline and Mary both travelled to NSW on the Friends.

1795 – Born 1 January 1795, baptised 8 February, St Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey, England, father Henry Boulton, tanner of Charlotte Row, mother Alice

1812 – Caroline Boulton is named as a beneficiary in the will of Thomas Boulton, a stonemason, came free to NSW, Minorca 1801. He names her as his niece with a bequest of £50. (He dies in 1817.)

1813 – 8 June, Caroline m. William English, St Philips, Sydney, NSW CS Sister Mary was one of the witnesses.

1814 – Caroline Boulton, off stores, wife to Mr English; Mr William English, free, shopkeeper, Parramatta; 1 child M

1814 – Son Thomas Henry born NSWBDM

1816 – Daughter Alice Ann born NSWBDM

1817 – 1 September, Certificate of Freedom 1/1917 issued

1817 – 6 September, William – came free, Parramatta schooner – and Caroline English and two children, Thomas Henry aged three and Alice aged 17 months sail on Henrietta to Hobart.

1818 – 7 January, William and Caroline English and two children, Thomas aged 4 and Alice aged 3 sailed on the Frederick for the Derwent (Hobart)

1819 – Mr William English, clerk to the magistrates, Hobart, Hobart Town Gazette, 10 April 1819

1819 – 25 October, son William Edward born Hobart, baptised 16 April 1820 TAS

1822 – 31 December, son Henry Thomas born Hobart, baptised 1 January 1823 TAS

1823 – October, Mr W English and family sailed for England on the Regalia, Sydney Gazette 23 October, 3 unnamed children on passenger list, along with Thomas Bolton (Caroline’s 21-year old brother)

1824 – son William Edward buried 4 July 1824, St George in the East, Tower Hamlets, “of Hermitage Street”

1824 – William English senior, aged 35, buried 8 August 1824, St George in the East, Tower Hamlets, “of Hermitage Street”

Caroline immediately returns to NSW with her brother Thomas Bolton and sister Ann Bolton.

1825 – 26 January, Caroline, Thomas and Ann Bolton arrive in Hobart from England on the Phoenix and sail from Hobart to Sydney on the Phoenix, Hobart Town Gazette, 18 February 1825, TAS
Only one child of “Mrs English” – a son – is noted on the passenger list printed in the Hobart Town Gazette on 28 January 1825.

1835 – 3 May, daughter Caroline born. Birth registered as Caroline English, born to Caroline English, with no father’s name listed. NSWBDM Baptised nearly three years later as Caroline Bolton at St Anne’s Hunters Hill, Sydney on 18 February 1838 to parents Edward Bolton and Caroline English, a widow, living at Bedlam Point (Gladesville).

1881 – Death of Caroline on 5 February, buried 6 February, Walcha, NSW

When William English died, he left a house and £200 to Caroline and £3 to Thomas Bolton. When his will was proved, Caroline received under £100.

Only a few months after Caroline returned from England, her sister Mary who had travelled with her as a convict on the Friends, died in Bringelly, NSW at the age of 32.

Caroline’s brother Thomas Bolton had arrived on the General Stewart in December 1818 as a 16 year old (he was Caroline’s youngest sibling).  He went on to be a successful publican in the colony, owning the Black Dog Inn in Gloucester Street, Sydney.  He also acquired considerable property.  He left Sydney in 1850 on the Samuel Boddington. Sister Ann Bolton married Thomas Redhead, a seaman from the Phoenix, the ship that brought her to NSW.  A few years after a second marriage, Ann died in Merri Creek, Melbourne in 1845, at the age of 47.

Very little is known about the later life of Caroline. There is much conjecture on family history sites that centres on what appears to be misleading information on a death certificate; most likely it is Caroline’s.   The death certificate records the burial of Caroline English, aged 69 years, on 6 February 1881 at Rangers Vale, Walcha, New South Wales. She had been ill for three months and died of natural decay. Her father’s name was recorded as Boulton, a farmer. It stated Caroline had been born in Sydney and married William English in Sydney at the age of 14.

It is suggested on family sites that much of this information had been massaged, likely originally by Caroline herself, going to great lengths to disguise her convict past. Instead, she was 86 years old when she died. The ages provided for both of Caroline’s two surviving children on her death certificate were also incorrect. Thomas’ age was given as 50, when he would have been 67; Caroline’s was given as 42 when she was four years older. The informant was Caroline’s son-in-law Christopher Bath who had married daughter Caroline English at Walcha in 1856. 

Adding to the confusion is the record of Thomas Henry English’s death on 17 October 1875, in Balmain, Sydney.  He was a waterman, aged 60 with six surviving of his eight children with wife Jane Gray.  Assuming this was Caroline’s son, he had died six years before his mother.

It is not known what happened to Caroline’s other children Alice Ann or Henry Thomas; it’s almost certain they died as young children.

There is nothing that clearly identifies the provenance of Edward Bolton, supposedly the father of her daughter Caroline.  It is not known if Caroline lived with him.

Sources:
Births, England, www.ancestry.com
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1813, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040
NSW Departing Crew and Passenger Lists, 1816-1825, www.ancestry.com
Family history site
Will of William English
Much of the research on the Bolton family in NSW, cited above, was undertaken by Margaret Parks of Canberra and is posted on www.ancestry.com

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Surrey Assizes, 18 August 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: 18 years old
Sentence: 7 years

Mary was tried with her father Henry and sisters Caroline and Alice. Mary and Caroline were convicted of stealing 15 yards of material from Sharp England, a linen draper in Southwark on 9 April 1810. Henry was convicted of receiving the stolen goods. In church records throughout the 1790s, Henry was recorded as a tanner, but in a petition seeking leniency he was described as a porter/seedsman whose wife had died after a long illness and left him with six children, three of whom had been placed under the care of the parish of Bermondsey (i.e. the Poor House).His late wife Alice had died aged 42 and was buried on 17 October 1806. Mary and Caroline were both sentenced to 7 years’ transportation; Henry was sentenced to 14 years, while 21-year old Alice escaped conviction. Henry, stating that he had been a respectable householder in Southwark for 18 years, petitioned for a pardon on his own behalf. He claimed that he was innocent but his daughters had been seduced into the crime by a “lewd girl” of their own young age. Henry’s petition was successful to the extent that he was not transported; instead he was sent to a prison hulk where he remained until he eventually received a pardon on 30 January 1813. He died a few years later, and was buried on 11 October 1816. Mary and Caroline both travelled to NSW on the Friends.

1792 – Born 6 September, baptised 30 September, St Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey, England, father Henry Boulton, tanner of Long Lane, mother Alice

1814 – Mary Boulton, off stores, (assigned to) to Mr Redman, Sydney M

1816 – 30 December, Mary Boulton, aged 24, m. Edward Gardner, aged 26, St Philips, Sydney, CS, NSWBDM

1818 – Son Henry born c. this date

1820 – Daughter Lucy born c. this date

1822 – Son Edward born 26 September

1822 – Mary, FBS, wife to G Gardner, Sydney M

1825 – Mary, wife to Edward Gardner, Liverpool M

1825 – Mary Gardener died 5 April, age given as 31, NSWBDM

1828 – Edward, 38, convict, Marquis of Wellington, overseer to J.W. Willford, Bringelly; Children: Henry 10, Lucy 8, Edward 6 , all born colony CEN

Edward was convicted in Worcester at the Lent Assizes 1814 of horse stealing and sentenced to death before his sentence was commuted to transportation for life.

Sources:
CS:
Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1816, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040
UK Prison Hulk Registers 1802-1849, www.ancestry.com

Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 11 April 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 26
Sentence: 7 years

Elizabeth was a charwoman who claimed she was on her way to work at six in the morning when she had found a lamp by a pillar by St Pauls’ churchyard. It seems she used a ladder to reach a street lamp which she then removed. The owner of an adjacent shop, noticing the lamp was missing when he was opening up the same morning, immediately went around and warned the local pawnbrokers to be on the lookout for the lamp. Within a few hours one of the pawnbrokers reported back that Elizabeth had brought the lamp into his shop and by 10 o’clock it had been ascertained it was the stolen lamp. By the time she was arrested Elizabeth was quite intoxicated.

1814 – Convict, off stores, single, Sydney M

1822 – Elizabeth Bone, servant to F. Byrne, Parramatta M

1825 – FBS, washerwoman, Sydney M

1828 – Eliz Bohen, 36, FBS, laundress, working at ) Catherine Linsey (Lindsey’s), Goulburn Street CEN

Sources:
Old Bailey 11 April 1810

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Surrey Quarter Sessions, Newington, 15 January 1811
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 19
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: Dublin, Ireland

Sarah was charged on 20 October 1810 with stealing a number of items from the house of widow Mary Randall in Esher, where Sarah also lived. They included three pairs of cotton hose, three silver teaspoons, one new check apron, two basins of Japan’d tea, one canister, one cap, two new shirts and a pair of men’s shoes belonging to the lodger, George Sily. Sarah was held in the Surrey County Gaol.

Sarah and Louisa Clark were the last two women to be convicted before they boarded the Friends.

1812 – 2 November, Sarah Berbrick m. Christopher Flood, St Johns, Parramatta, Samuel Marsden’s marriage returns CS, NSWBDM.

1822 – Sarah Babriel, FBS, wife of C Flood, Sydney M

1825 – FBS, wife of Christopher Flood Sydney M

1828 – Sarah Flood aged 36, wife of Charles, 52, Catholic, housekeeper, York St CEN

1830 – 30 December, Sarah charged with assault and imprisoned in Sydney Gaol. GD

1831 – 18 January, Sarah released from gaol on bail. GD

1851 – Sarah Flood died, aged 56 NSWBDM

In the Sydney Gaol records Sarah is described as: born 1792, 5’ 4 ¼”, stout, fair, brown hair, grey eyes. Her native place was given as Dublin, religion Catholic and trade or calling – none.

Christopher Flood (Britannia, 1798, 7 years) became a publican in York Street, Sydney.

Sources:
Surrey Quarter Sessions 1780-1820, Surrey History Trust, QS2/6/1811/EPH/78
CS : Marriage return for quarter ending 31 December 1812, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 19 September 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 30
Sentence: 7 years

Jane was a house servant who lived and worked in the house of Archibald and Jane Hamilton at 17 Duke Street, St James. While Mrs Hamilton was out of town in August 1810, in Margate, Jane stole a pellise (a short outer cloak), a gown and 10 yards of silk belonging to her mistress and pawned them. The pawnbroker helped to identify her.

1812 – 3 April, Jane Breice m. James Cox, St Philips Sydney, Rev. Cowper’s marriage returns CS, NSWBDM.

James Cox, Barwell, 1798, 7 years

1814 – (Assigned) to James Cox, off stores, Windsor M

1822 – Jane Bryce, FBS, wife of James Cox, FBS, landholder, Liverpool M

1825 – Wife of James Cox, Liverpool M

1828 – Jane, 50, and James 49, sawyer and farmer, Botany CEN

Sources:
Old Bailey 19 September 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1812, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040, 6070

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 5 December 1810
Crime: Pocketpicking
Age: 18
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: London

Elizabeth was a prostitute who had asked William Hants, a wine cooper of Whitechapel, back to her room. He had a bundle of dirty clothes under his arm. When she left him in the room, Hants realised she had taken the bundle of clothing and his watch from his pocket. Elizabeth had also taken his corkscrew.

Elizabeth gave birth during her voyage on the Friends. Henry Brown was born on 1 August 1811. CS See Henry Brown

Elizabeth married just two weeks after the Friends docked in Sydney Cove.

1811 – 25 October, Elizabeth Brown m. Elias Ingram, St Philips, Sydney, Rev Cowper’s marriage returns, CS
Elias Ingram, Indian, 1810, 14 years

1814 – Convict, off stores, Sydney, wife to E Ingram, convict, on stores, sawyer, Lane Cove M

1819 – Elizabeth Brown, servant, Kerry Lodge, Nepean CS

1825 – Certificate of Freedom issued on 6 October 1825 No. 18/4430, issued in lieu of earlier certificate returned mutilated and cancelled. Age 36, native place: London, servant, 5 feet 1” tall, complexion fair pale, hair grey, eyes hazel CF

1825 – FBS, wife of E Ingram, landholder, Sydney M

1828 – Aged 35, Catholic, housekeeper to Michael McGuire, Darling Harbour; Elias Ingram, pensioner, Benevolent Asylum CEN

In 1819 Elizabeth had completed her sentence and her husband was in Sydney so it is unclear why she was in the Nepean. It is possible her husband’s health had already started to decline and she needed to find work to help support them. Kerry Lodge was a 140-acre property at Castlereagh. SG 8 Nov. 1817, p. 4

Sources:
Old Bailey 5 December 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1811, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040, 6070; Henry Brown: Admitted to male orphan school in January 1819, NRS 898 4/7208; also NSWSR NRS 796 [1]; Reel 2777; 1477, p. 1 (record includes birthdate)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 11 January 1809
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 22
Sentence: 7 years

Mary was with 20-year old Hannah Skidday when they were caught shoplifting 22 yards of printed cotton and a shawl from Mr Brown and Mr Brown Linen Drapers. It was Skidday who dropped the cloth when they were apprehended outside the shop. Mary claimed she was innocent though they had entered the shop with another woman and the apprentice in the shop was immediately suspicious of the trio. The third woman got away. Mary and Hannah were both convicted and sentenced to transportation. Hannah travelled to NSW on the Indispensable just one month later.

Mary had to wait two years in Newgate Gaol for her passage on the Friends. Then, after a six-month voyage, Mary died just over two weeks after her arrival in Sydney. She was buried on 29 October 1811. Reverend William Cowper recorded her age as 26. CS

Despite her death, Mary’s name appears on convict lists until 1819.

Sources:
Old Bailey 11 January 1809
CS: Burial returns for quarter ending 31 December 1811, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040, 6070

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 11 April 1810
Crime: Violent theft
Age: 31
Sentence: 7
Native place: Tralee, Ireland

Mary Browning was convicted of accosting Michael Myers late at night in Long Acre, SoHo, and stealing his watch. Myers was a glass cutter who worked in Leather Lane and he was on his way home from a public house in the same street when he encountered Browning. He admitted he was rather worse for liquor. When he realised she had taken his watch, Myers said Browning ran off with him in pursuit. She dropped the watch but was caught by a night watchman and the watch was subsequently recovered. Browning told a different story: Myers was drunk and insisted she go with him but she told him she was not fit. She said he dropped his watch and she had picked it up and then he attacked her with a knife. The watchman backed Myers’ story.

A woman named Mary Browning, aged 32, who may or may not have been the same person, was found not guilty of shoplifting at the Old Bailey a few months earlier on 10 January 1810.

Mary Browning travelled on the Friends with at least her daughter Elizabeth who was five or six years old. It is possible she also travelled with her son Edward though conflicting information is provided in the musters as to whether he “came free” or was born in the colony. It is possible she also travelled with another son William. See Edward Browning See William Browning

The death certificate of her daughter Elizabeth shows Mary gave birth to her in Tralee, Ireland. See Elizabeth Browning

1812– 26 August, Sought permission to marry at Hawkesbury CS

1812 – 31 August, Mary Browning m. Edward Goodin, St Matthews, Windsor CS, NSWBDM (same day that Mary Callaghan, also on Friends, was married)

1814 – Convict, off stores, wife to E Goodwin; 2 children off stores, Windsor M

1819 – (assigned to) W. Hill; 5 children off stores M

1820 – (with) Edward Goodwin; 3 sons, 1 daughter, Windsor M

1822 – FBS, wife of E Goodwin; 3 unnamed children BC, Edward Browning CF, Windsor M

1824 – 20 May, Certificate of Freedom issued no. 44/2205, Age: 42, Native place: Tralee, servant, 5 feet 3 ½” tall, pale complexion, brown to grey hair, light blue eyes CF

1825 – Lives with Mick O’Connor, Richmond; Children of Mary Browning: Edward 11, Mary 9, David 7, all BC M

1828 – Mary Goodwin, FBS, aged 50, Catholic, Factory, Parramatta CEN

1828 – Husband: Edward Goodin, 60, Fortune 1806, FBS, labourer, Kissing Point CEN

1853 – 11 May, died at Freeman’s Reach, Hawkesbury

There is no record in NSWBDM of any children born to Mary, or to Mary and Edward.

Sources:
Old Bailey 11 April 1810
CS: 26 August 1812, NRS 935 Reel 6002, p. 135; Marriage return for quarter ended 30 September 1812, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040, 6070
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 5 December 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 31
Sentence: 7 years

Mary was caught stealing a handkerchief valued at 3 shillings from a linen draper’s shop in John Street. She was caught when the man she was with, Thomas Cohen, was seen handing her the linen. Mary and Thomas claimed not to know each other. Both were sentenced to transportation, though Thomas cannot be found under that name on any transportation register.

There were two Mary Bryants on board the Friends, both convicted at the Old Bailey. It has not been possible to clearly distinguish between the records of the two of them in NSW. The Mary “Bryan” convicted in December 1810 appears on convict lists in 1817, 1818 and 1819, though the lists in themselves were not reliable. This may be the same Mary “Briant” who died in 1818 with her age given as 40. NSWBDM The second Mary “Brian”, of the Friends, age given as 35, died on 24 September 1814 and was buried at St Philips in Sydney. CS  The ages given at the time of their convictions and deaths provide for confusion.

Sources:
Old Bailey 5 December 1810
CS: Burial return for quarter ended 30 September 1814, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 19 September 1810
Crime: Embezzlement
Age: 37
Sentence: 14 years
Transportation Register: Wife of Daniel Bryant

Possible marriage: Mary Gosington m. Daniel Briant, St James, Piccadilly, 2 April 1805

Mary was employed as a servant to James Farquhar and Joseph Riley, straw plat manufacturers and was trusted by them to handle money transactions. She had gone out and sold some straw plat to a regular customer, milliner John Wiltshire, and then claimed he had not paid her the £4 14s owing. Instead, she took the money and forged an IOU from Wiltshire and gave it to her employers. Mary claimed in court that she had lost the money that he had paid her and she was just trying to buy herself some time to make good.

There were two Mary Bryants on board the Friends, both convicted at the Old Bailey. It has not been possible to clearly distinguish between the records of the two of them in NSW. It is more likely that this is the Mary “Brian”, of the Friends, who died 24 September 1814 and was buried at St Philips in Sydney, though her age was given as 35. CS The other Mary “Bryan”, convicted in December 1810 appears on convict lists in 1817, 1818 and 1819, though the lists in themselves were not reliable. This may be the same Mary “Briant” who died in 1818 with her age given as 40. NSWBDM The ages given at the time of their convictions and deaths provide for confusion.

Sources:
Old Bailey 19 September 1810
CS: Burial return for quarter ended 30 September 1814, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Surrey Quarter Sessions, Guildford, 10 July 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 35
Sentence: 7 years

Mary, wife of James Burgess, labourer of Dorking, was charged on 19 May 1810 of stealing a capon from the farmyard of William Jordan at Charlwood. One of the witnesses who appeared for her was James Burgess, of Old Gaol Garden, Horsham, a tanner and broom-maker, possibly her father-in-law. She was held in the Guildford House of Correction.

Van Diemen’s Land:

1814 – Trans-shipped to Van Diemen’s Land on Windham

1817 – 12 May, Convicted of stealing a jacket from John Herbert, sentenced to 3 months’ hard labour in the gaol

1817 – 20 September, Neglecting to attend the general muster, acquitted

1820 – Free, Wife of H. Parker, Port Dalrymple (Launceston, VDL)

1821 – Free, Wife of H. Parker, Port Dalrymple

1823 – aged 48, married to William Parker, 3 children, living in Norfolk Plains

Sources:
Surrey Quarter Sessions 1780-1820, Surrey History Trust, QS2/6/1810/MID/69
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)
Convict record Tasmanian State Archives
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Sessions of the Peace, London, 16 July 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 27
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: Cambridge

1814 – Convict, off stores, no children, single, Sydney M

1819 – Ann Brynes, (assigned to) W. Walsh M

1820 – 15 November Ann Barns, one month in gaol GD

1825 – FBS, Factory, Parramatta M

1828 – Ann Burns, 45, FBS servant (to) Thos Rowley, Holdsworthy CEN

1838 – Ann Burns, born 1791, 5’ 3 ¼”, sallow complexion, gray hair, hazel eyes GD

1838 – 4 September – Ann Burns, free, native place: Cambridge, servant, labour 14 days GD

Ann was issued ToL number 1147. CI

Middlesex Sessions of the Peace records are not online.

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also spelt Mary Callaghan

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 18 July 1810
Crime: Pocketpicking
Age: about 17
Sentence: 7 years

Mary lived with Ephraim Wilson, a shoemaker, at 3 Church Street, St Giles. She was convicted alongside Wilson of picking the pocket of Thomas King, a purser’s ship steward. Mary had taken King back to their lodgings and King had sent out for some liquor and fell asleep intoxicated. While he slept, Mary and Wilson robbed him of his watch and £4 19s. Some of the money was later found on Wilson and the watch was recovered from a pawnbroker. In court, Wilson tried to take the blame for the theft but both he and Mary were sentenced to transportation.

Wilson was put on board the prison hulk Laurel at Portsmouth on 31 August 1810 and discharged from the hulk on 25 January 1812 at the age of 49. There is no record of anyone by his name on a transportation register, nor is there any record of him in NSW. Given the big age difference, Mary’s exact relationship to Wilson is unclear.

1812 – 26 August, letter to Rev Robert Cartwright, Hawkesbury, transmitting permission for Mary to marry CS

1812 – 31 August Mary Callaghan m. Edward Weaver, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns CS (same day as Mary Browning, also on Friends, was married)

1814 – Mary Kelly, off stores, wife to Edward Weavers, Windsor M

1822 – Edward Weaver alias Price, FBS, carpenter, Windsor M

1825 – Wife of Edward Weaver, Windsor; Son: Richard Callaghan , BC M (NSWBDM b. 1819, father Edward Weaver)

1828 – Mary Price, also Callaghan, 35, FBS; Edward Price, 61, FBS, Ablemarle 1791, 7 years, carpenter, Pitt Town, both Catholic CEN

Sources:
Old Bailey 18 July 1810
CS: 26 August 1812, NRS 935 Reel 6002, p. 135; Marriage return for quarter ended 30 September 1812, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898 Reels 6020-6040

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Tried as Jane Carbray

Convicted: Staffordshire Quarter Sessions, Lichfield, 15 August 1809
Crime: High treason
Age: about 16
Sentence: Death, later commuted to transportation for life
Native place: Stafford

Jane worked as a childsmaid. She was tried as Jane Carbray, spinster, for high treason alongside John Gregory, labourer, and Michael Campbell, labourer, all of St Chad’s parish, Stowe, in Lichfield. The charge was intending to deceive and defraud King and people (with the fear of God before their eyes, but seduced by the Devil) by passing counterfeit coin (a sixpence) and also with forging and counterfeiting coin. All pleaded not guilty, but they were found guilty by jury and sentenced to hang. On 21 Aug 1809 all three received the King’s pardon, and their sentences were commuted to life and transportation to NSW or islands adjacent for life.

Four days after she was convicted, Jane gave birth to a son John, fathered by John Gregory. The child was baptised with the surname Carbray on 14 October 1810 at St Mary’s, Lichfield. The father John Gregory was born in Montreal, Canada, in 1786 and joined the 60th Regiment in 1803. He reached the rank of lieutenant before resigning in 1807 due to lameness in one leg. Gregory was transported to NSW on the Indian in 1810. See John Gregory

A note in the trial records at Lichfield states in the year following Jane’s conviction: “It appearing to this court that Jane Carbray a prisoner confined in the common Gaol in the said city for high treason cannot pursue employment sufficient to sustain herself by her industry – it is ordered by the court pursuant to the statute passed in the 31st year of the reign – “an act for the better regulation of gaols and other places of confinement” that the sum of six shillings shall be paid for the courts of the said city, weekly and every week for “sufficient food” for her health”.

1812 – Approximate birth year of daughter Eleanor, father John Gregory

1814 – Jane Carbury, on stores, wife to Mr Gregory, clerk in Commissary General’s office, Sydney, on stores, 2 children on stores M

1820 – 20 October, sent to the Hospital, sent to Parramatta Gaol GD

1822 – 1 January, charged with stealing a child’s cap, to be sent to the Factory for 3 months GD

1822 – Convict, gaol, Factory, Parramatta, Child (unnamed) aged 2 months M

1822 – 10 October, to be sent to the Factory GD

1823 – 1 and 10 Apr 1823 re permission to marry at Liverpool CS

1823 – 28 April, Jane Carberry, prisoner, 36, m. John Moss free, 40, St Lukes, Liverpool CS

1824 – 12 January, Jane Moss frequently absconding (words indecipherable), at large without authority, to be sent to the Factory and not allowed to go out GD

1825 – Wife of John Moss, Liverpool; Daughter: Jane Carberry, 10 M

1827 – 12 January, Jane Moss, Sydney, charged with being illegally at large, her husband being at Newcastle, to remain in gaol until further orders, discharged 7 April GD

1827 – 9 June, Jane Moss, disgraceful conduct, sentence: 1st class at the Factory, 18 June sent to Parramatta GD

1831 – 15 June, notice of ToL, native place: Stafford, childsmaid , SAG; Sydney Gazette 15 June. Described as married.

1833 – 24 September, died in the Factory hospital, age 40 NSWBDM, ToL

It is likely Jane’s age was closer to 30 when she married John Moss in 1823 . Her ticket of leave issued in 1831 gave her birth year as 1796; her age noted at death suggests a birth year of 1793. A display panel in the Samuel Johnson Birthplace Museum in Lichfield, titled “Execution and Transportation”, states that Jane was 14 years old when convicted in 1809, i.e. a birth year of 1795 though no source for this can be located; no age was recorded in any of the Lichfield court records.

John Gregory was sent from Sydney to Van Diemen’s Land on the Kangaroo in 1816, to work as a clerk in the Commissary’s Office in Hobart. In 1823 his brother, an officer in the 19th Light Dragoons, wrote from an address in Edinburgh, Scotland, to the Colonial Secretary of NSW, trying to establish if he was still living. This prompted Gregory to write a letter recording some of his history which is in the CS files. He stated he had two motherless children aged 14 and 11. The children he had with Jane (John and Eleanor) went with Gregory to Van Diemen’s Land, perhaps in 1816 or later. Gregory was pardoned in 1840. His history is confused by the number of men of the same name who were in Van Diemen’s Land, one of whom became a bushranger and another the Colonial Treasurer.

One family website suggests that John Moss was the former convict who arrived on the Pitt in 1792. He was convicted at the Old Bailey at the age of 14 for a highway robbery in Shoreditch and sentenced to seven years’ transportation.

Sources:
Information supplied by Museums and Heritage Office, Lichfield City Council from trial records held by the Lichfield Record Office
Staffordshire Stoke on Trent Archive Service
CS: 1 April 1823, NRS 937 Reel 6010, p. 34; Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1823, St Lukes, Liverpool, NRS 898 Reel 6025
Convict Death Register, www.ancestry.com.au
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 19 September 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 19
Sentence: 7 years

Mary went into a linen drapers on Ludgate Hill with two other woman and contrived to conceal a piece of printed muslin under her cloak. She was seen by two men working in the shop and was allowed to leave the shop with the stolen cloth before one of them went after her. She was charged with the theft of 24 yards of cambric.

1812 – 30 June, Mary McCarty m. George Stephenson, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS

1814 – Mary McCarty, off stores, wife to G Stevenson, Sydney. M

1814 – George Stevenson, Guildford, confined in goal, off stores M

1818 – Mary Stephenson died aged 30, NSWBDM

The 1822 muster shows George Stephenson as a stonemason in Sydney.

Sources:
Old Bailey 19 September 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1812, St Johns, NRS 898, Reel 6024-6025

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Louisa Beckwith (sometimes spelt Louisa Beckworth)

Convicted: Surrey Quarter Sessions, Newington, 15 January 1811
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 25
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: London

Louisa was tried as Louisa Clark, single woman of Lambeth. On 17 October 1810, she was charged with stealing a silver watch, a dollar and “other monies” from Joseph Whittimore at Lambeth. He was the driver of the Chichester coach. She was held in the Surrey County Gaol. Louisa and Sarah Bowbrick were the last two women to be convicted before they boarded the Friends.

The keeper of the county goal at Southwark recounted: “…I remember a woman, Louisa Clark, convicted at the last Quarter Sessions; she had been tried six or seven times; her mother and sister are both at Botany Bay, and she has had frequent letters from them. The Court ordered her to be transported for seven years; she had such a dislike to go, that the night before she shammed mad, and tore all her clothes to pieces. I got her fresh clothing, and put them on; she served me so again, and I had the greatest difficulty to get her on board the ship; her mother and sister were both there, and this must have been information from them.”

Mary Beckwith (34), wife of John, and Mary Beckwith junior (14) were both convicted at the Old Bailey on 9 July 1800 of stealing privately from a shop; they were transported on the Nile in 1801. The older woman said at their trial that the younger woman was her stepdaughter and this is borne out by her birth in Chelmsford rather than London. The younger Mary was pardoned on 5 August 1800 and was to be sent to the Philanthropic Society, a reformatory institution for the children of convicts, however, the trustees of the society refused to admit her as she was too old and so she was transported after all. It is probable these two were Louisa’s mother and stepsister.

Louisa (again as Clark) had been acquitted of three earlier charges of larceny in July 1808, July 1809 and October 1810. She was acquitted on another charge of larceny in December 1809 when her age was given as 23 and she was described as “one of Mrs Barrington’s gang”. CR

1812 – 24 March Louisa Beckworth m. John Eaton, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS Recorded as Louisa Bethwick in NSWBDM

1814 – Convict, off stores, wife to J Eaton, Sydney; John Eaton, Indian, (assigned to) Mr Lord, Sydney M

1819 – (with) Eaton M

1822 – Louisa Clarke, FBS, wife of J Eaton Sydney M

1825 – Louisa Clarke , free, wife of Wm Eaton Sydney. John Eaton, ToL, Indian, Life, hatter, Sydney M

1825 – 22 May, Louisa Beckwith, Breach of the peace, released on bail. GD

1829 – 8 June, Louisa Beckwith, Drunkedness, sentenced to 3rd class at Factory, for 2 months GD

1830 – 21 May, Louisa Beckwith, Common prostitute, to be sent to the Factory for 1 month GD

1830 – 3 July, Louisa Beckwith, Common prostitute, sentenced to 3rd class Factory for 1 month GD

1832 – 11 February, Sydney Gazette, p. 3 “Police Report”: Louisa Beckwith was accused of being “tosticated in licker” by one of the constables. The dame pleaded in extenuation that “it was all the fault of her birthday” but “as such birthdays generally occur in her calendar weekly, she was desired to pay five shillings for its celebration”.

1834 – 17 December, Louisa Beckwith, arrived as prisoner, Sydney Gaol, born London, Protestant, servant, bail to be £10, discharged 17 January 1835 GD

1837 – 2 May, Sentenced to labour for 1 month, discharged 30 May GD

1837 – Born 1799, slender, sallow complexion, brown hair, blue eyes GD (Birth year was incorrect)

Louisa did not see her mother in NSW. Mary Beckwith had taken up with Judge Advocate Richard Atkins, living with him first as his housekeeper, and received an absolute pardon on 26 April 1810. She travelled back to England with him on the Hindostan and arrived in England in October 1810 , shortly before Louisa was jailed. Mary married Atkins at St Andrews, Holborn, on 6 October 1817. CS, www.ancestry.com

Louisa’s stepsister Mary Beckwith junior left NSW on the Geographie in November 1802 with the French explorer Nicholas Baudin. Baudin died in Mauritius in September 1803, but before he died he asked his brother Augustin, then in command of a Danish merchant vessel, to take charge of Mary. It is not known what happened to her.

Author Anthony Brown has suggested that a story related by Captain R.W. Eastwick in his memoir: “A Master Mariner: Being the Life and Adventures of Captain Robert William Eastwick, ed. by H. Compton, London 1891” refers to Mary Bethwick senior. Eastwick talked of meeting a gentlewoman in fallen circumstances living in Sydney in 1803 who was working as a maid to “the judge’s wife”. This same woman went on to make a respectable marriage in the colony (by 1818 at least) and remain there. The ages and dates provided by Eastwick are not supported by what we know of Mary Bethwick senior’s life.

Sources:
Surrey Quarter Sessions QS2/6/1811/EPH/79, Surrey History Trust
Testimony of Mr James Ives, keeper of the county goal at Horsemonger Lane, Southwark, 3 April 1811, Appendix to Report from the Committee on Laws in “Selection of reports and papers of the House of Commons: Prisons (I), Vol 51”
CS : Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1812, St Johns, NRS 898, Reel 6024-6025

Mother and sister:
Old Bailey 9 July 1800
Criminal Register, 9 July 1800, HO26, piece 7, p. 6 CR
CS: Petition from Richard Atkins, 12 February 1810, NRS 900, Fiche 3163-3253, p. 14; Letter from Richard Atkins 23 March 1810, (filed as 26 April), NRS 897 4/1723 pp. 246-247
Convict Register of Conditional and Absolute Pardons, 26 April 1810, State Archives NSW, www.ancestry.com.au
Marriage register for St Andrews, Holborn, 6 October 1817, www.ancestry.com.au
Dictionary of Sydney

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Northumberland Assizes, Newcastle, 25 August 1810
Crime: Receiving stolen goods
Age: unknown
Sentence: 14 years

1813 – 10 August, Margaret Cowens m. Thomas Jones, St Philips, Sydney, Rev. Cowper’s marriage returns CS Recorded as Marg Cowers NSWBDM

1814 – Convict, on stores, one child on stores, wife to a veteran, Parramatta M

1822 – Margaret Gowen, FBS, wife of T James, Parramatta, Child born colony aged 12* M

1825 – Margaret Jones, FBS, wife of Thomas Jones, Parramatta M

* Age is incorrect if born in colony

Sources:
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 September 1813, St Philips, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Sessions of the Peace, London, 8 December 1809
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 28
Sentence: 7 years
Remarks: A transport before and pardoned

Sarah was convicted of stealing plates and (word indecipherable in Criminal Register).

The Criminal Register has two records of a Sarah Davis who was previously pardoned. They may all be the same person. On 14 July 1802, Londoner Sarah Davis, aged 20, was convicted at the Old Bailey of stealing linen and clothing from the house of her employer in St Catherines. She was found guilty and sentenced to death but mercy was recommended on account of her youth and the probability she had been lured away from her parents to work in the house. She was pardoned on 8 September 1802 and her sentence was commuted to six months in the House of Corrections.

On 30 October 1805, Sarah Davis, aged 22, was convicted of stealing a wheelbarrow in Curtain Road, Shoreditch. She was described by a witness in court as someone who made her living by thieving. Sarah herself described herself as a box maker (perhaps for cigars). She was sentenced to transportation for seven years but pardoned on 3 May 1806. Her sentence was commuted to 12 months in the House of Correction. It was noted that she had been there before.

1813 – 9 August, Sarah Davis m. Robert Sells, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev.Cartwright’s marriage returns, CS, NSWBDM

1814 – Convict, Liverpool, off stores, one child off stores, wife to J Sells M

1822 – Wife of R Sells Windsor M

1825 – Wife of Robert Sells, Cawdon M

1828 – Aged 47, FBS, wife of Robert Sells, Minerva, ToL, aged 48, labourer BongBong, Protestant; Children Robert 14, Mary 11, George 5, all born colony CEN

1836 – Died aged 55 NSWBDM

Sources:
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 September 1813, St Matthews, Windsor NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Cumberland Quarter Sessions, Carlisle, 2 May 1810
Crime: Petit larceny
Age: unknown
Sentence: 7 years

Jane was described in court as the wife of James Dixon, labourer, late of the Parish of St Cuthbert. She was tried and convicted by jury with Elizabeth Jones and Sarah Graham, also of the same place, for stealing eight yards of printed calico valued at 10p, the goods of William Ross, and three pieces of thread lace valued at 10p, the goods of Thomas Dent. The 12 jurors included a painter, two joiners, a shoemaker, breeches maker, glazier, farrier, innkeeper, saddler, gardener, grocer and a gunsmith. All three women were sentenced to transportation and travelled on the Friends.

1812 – 18 March, Jane Dixon m. John Holmes, St Philips, Sydney, Rev. Cowper’s marriage returns CS

1814 – Convict, off stores, no children, wife to J. Holmes, Sydney M

1821 – Wife to John Holmes, Settler and Convict Lists M

No further information has been confirmed. A woman named Jane Holmes died in 1821 aged 33. NSWBDM

In the 1814 muster, John Holmes was either the man who came on the Gorgon, carpenter, or the man who came on the Admiral Gambier, ToL, servant. A man named John Holmes died in 1820, aged 28. NSWBDM

Sources:
Cumbria Archives Service: Easter Quarter Sessions 1810, CQ11 Session Papers, Indictments; Abstract Book CQ3/3
Cumberland Pacquet, 15 May 1810, p. 3
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1812, St Philips, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 19 September 1810
Crime: TheftAge: 21
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: London

Catherine lived with 22-year old Richard Crouch at the Weavers Arms. Crouch had a wooden leg. They were both convicted of stealing a jacket, two pawnbrokers’ tickets and 19 £1 bank notes from a sailor, Edward Kinan, who also lodged at the public house. Both were sentenced to transportation.

Richard Crouch was sent to the prison hulk Retribution at Woolwich on 21 February 1811 and remained there for the entire term of his sentence, likely on account of his infirmity. He was discharged on 19 September 1817.

1813 – 17 January, Catharine Driscal m. Robert Sides, St Johns Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS, NSWBDM

1814 – Convict, Parramatta, off stores, wife to Robert Sides, convict, Admiral Gambier, off stores, assigned to Mrs King M

1820 – Catherine Driskel, FBS, married to Robert Sides, Castlereagh and Evans districts; one son M

1822 – FBS, wife of R Sides, Parramatta, Robert Sides, labourer, Parramatta; Child aged 3 M

1824 – 5 August, Certificate of Freedom issued, No. 28/2457 Age: 32, native place: London, servant, 5 feet ½ “ tall, sallow complexions, dark brown to grey hair, dark hazel eyes CF

1824 – Robert Sides died, aged 45 NSWBDM

1825 – Housekeeper , Parramatta M

1826 – Catharine Driscoll m. Joseph Lee, St Johns, Parramatta NSWBDM

1827 – Joseph Lee died, NSWBDM

1828 – Catherine Lee, aged 40, FBS, wife of Joseph Lee, Henry 1823, ToL, Protestant, weaver, Parramatta; Son Jonathan Sides, aged 7, born colony CEN

1830 – Catherine Driscoll m. John Freeman, Bong Bong, Sutton Forest NSWBDM

1830 – John Freeman died NSWBDM

1831 – Catharine Driscoll m. Thomas Kelly, Pitt Town, NSWBDM

Sources:
Old Bailey 19 September 1810
UK Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802 – 1849 www.ancestry.com.au
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1813, St Johns, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: High Court of Justiciary, Glasgow , 23 April 1810
Crime: Theft
Age: about 19
Sentence: 7 years

Janet worked as a servant for merchant James Rintoul in Glasgow.  She was convicted of stealing wearing apparel, a gold watch, gold rings and other items belonging to him.  The jury were unanimous in their guilty verdict.

1811 – 23 February, Janet and two other women from Glasgow were sent under “a proper escort” to Edinburgh

1811 – 26 February, Janet was sent by ship to London

1812 – Daughter Betty is born, mother Jane Duff, father is Samuel Foster, came free on the Sydney Cove, 1809, baker*

1814 – Jane Duff, Sydney, convict, off stores, no child, assigned to Mr Gore M

1816 – Rebecca J. Hooper born to George and Jane Hooper NSWBDM

1817 – 24 February, Jane Duff, aged 26, free, m. George Hooper, aged 30, free, St Philips, Sydney , Rev. Cowper’s marriage returns, CS Recorded as George Cooper in NSWBDM

1820 – 1 May, Janet issued Certificate of Freedom No. 4/2454 (family history website)

1820 – George Hooper died, aged 45 NSWBDM

1828 – Rebecca Hooper, born colony, at School of Industry (Female Orphan School) CEN

1833 – “Jane” died in Launceston, VDL aged 40

*This birth is recorded in NSWBDM but no father’s name is provided. The detail about the father is from a family history website.

According to the same family website, George Hooper was a mariner who had come from Mauritius. He was master of the Henrietta packet that sailed the route between Port Jackson and Van Diemen’s Land. In August 1820 Janet sailed to Port Dalrymple, VDL, on the Glory with Jonathan Griffiths and two of his sons. Janet lived with Griffiths, near Launceston, VDL as his housekeeper. In 1824, Elizabeth (Betty) sailed on the Glory to Port Dalrymple to join her mother Janet. In 1825, some years after George’s death, Janet ’s daughter Rebecca was placed in the Female Orphan School and remained there for five years.

Janet is probably the “Jane Hooper” who had a daughter to Captain William Lushington Goodwin in Launceston, VDL, in 1832. If so, she was about 39 years old at the time. Goodwin, who was master of the Kains, had a wife and family back in England. The child, named Jane May, died the following year.

“Jane Hooper” drowned when she fell into the Tamar River, near Launceston, drunk, in 1833 aged 40.

Sources:
Caledonian Mercury, “Circuit Intelligence”, 26 April 1810; 25 and 28 February 1811
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1817, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024
Family history website

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Mary Sullivan

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 6 June 1810
Crime: Violent theft
Age: 28
Sentence: 7 years
Tried as Elizabeth Durant alias Elizabeth Sullivan

Elizabeth picked up a man in the street in the London district of St Giles and took him to the Turk’s Head, where she drank gin. William Gardener was a waterman from Gloucestershire with a wife and family at home. Elizabeth told him it would cost half a crown to spend the night with her and he accepted. She took him back to her rooms in Church Lane, where she asked him for 18p to pay for her lodging. Gardener handed over more money to pay for some liquor and Elizabeth called on Mary Kite and Elizabeth Ellis to fetch it. Gardener fell asleep and when he awoke he found his watch gone, along with 9 shillings and a bundle of clothes he had with him. The women were still in the room and Gardener placed himself against the door to prevent them escaping until they surrendered his belongings. By morning, Mary Kite was all for murdering him and she took up a large pair of bellows, Elizabeth took up an iron bar and Mary Ellis a pewter pot. Together the women attacked Gardener. He managed to escape out the door and find a night watchman to assist him. All three women were arrested and convicted and sentenced to transportation. Both Elizabeth and Mary Kite travelled on the Friends.

1812 – 16 June, Elizabeth Durant m. William Herbert, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage return, CS NSWBDM

1814 – Elizabeth died 8 May, slain by natives, Liverpool burial return, CS

Elizabeth’s death was reported in the Sydney Gazette on 14 May 1814. A few days earlier, soldiers had fired on some aborigines taking corn from a settler’s field in the Appin district. A native boy was killed and the aborigines retaliated, killing one of the soldiers. Another group of soldiers fired on more aborigines on a neighbouring property and a native woman and two more children were killed. The next day the aborigines attacked a stock keepers’s hut on the property of Mrs McArthur. The stock keeper William Baker was killed, alongwith Elizabeth who was with him. Her name was reported as “Mary Sullivan, generally called Hirburt”.

There were two William Herberts recorded in the 1814 muster in Liverpool: William Herbert, Coromandel 2, off stores, ToL, labourer, Liverpool and William Herbert, Shipley, life.

Sources:
Old Bailey 6 June 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1812, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Burial return for quarter ended 30 June 1814, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Montgomery Quarter Sessions, Welshpool, Wales, 11 January 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 44
Sentence: 7 years
Widow

Ann was a widow who lived in the Parish of Meifod. In October 1809, a shop apprentice who worked for Oliver Jones and Richard Griffiths was unpacking some loaves of sugar from a chest and left them unattended while he served a customer. When he returned to the task, he noticed two of the conical loaves missing. One shop assistant remembered seeing Jane Lloyd, a woman “of bad character”, in the shop earlier and so suspected her. Another assistant said Ann, who was unknown to them, was also in the shop and she bought some knitting needles. Both men went off to find Lloyd as they knew where she lived. They found her with Ann Evans on the road and the sugar was hidden under their cloaks. Ann also had a loaf of bread. She claimed Jane had given her the sugar though she admitted she knew it was stolen. The women both begged for forgiveness in Welsh and asked to be allowed to go home to their children who were home alone and had no meal. Both women were convicted of stealing and sentenced to transportation. The two loaves of sugar weighed 13lbs and had a value – variously described in court records – of 5 or 10 shillings. The value of the theft attributed to Ann – no doubt to avoid having to sentence her to a more serious fate – was 10p. Only Ann was transported; Jane Lloyd later escaped from gaol.

1791 – 4 May, Ann Walters m. John Evans, Meifod

1814 – 30 May, Ann Evans (age recorded as 30) m. Lachlan Monican, ToL, Tellicherry, aged 40, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS Recorded as Locklan Monican in NSWBDM

1814 – Convict, off stores, assigned to Mrs King, Parramatta; Lachlan Monaghan, off stores, assigned to Mrs King, Parramatta M

1824 – 18 November, Certificate of Freedom issued, no. 54/2943, Age: 56, 4 feet 11 ½ “ tall, sallow complexion, grey hair, blue eyes CF

1825 – FBS, wife of Laurence Monaghan, Liverpool M

1828 – Ann Monaghan also Evans, aged 60, married to Laurence Monaghan, 75, CP, Life, landholder Cabramatta CEN

Ann’s age was recorded in court documents in January 1811 as 46. Lloyd’s was recorded as 47.

Sources:
Montgomeryshire marriages, www.findmypast.co.nz Montgomery Quarter Sessions book, complaint laid 17 October 1809, Powys County Archives
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June, 1814, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 5 December 1810
Crime: Burglary, Receiving stolen goods
Age: 40
Sentence: 14 years
Transportation Register: Wife of Thomas Field

Lydia was tried alongside Thomas Robinson and she was charged with receiving goods that Robinson had stolen. Lydia lived at 10 Short Gardens with her husband Thomas Field. A number of stolen household items were found in her room, including a bed, blankets, a quilt and carpet and Lydia claimed they had been placed there by Robinson; that her husband had agreed to it and she had argued with him about it and her husband had gone to look for Robinson again when the constables arrived. The items had come from a house in Upper Berkley Street, Marylebone. Lydia was found guilty and sentenced to 14 years’ transportation and Robinson was sentenced to death. Robinson’s sentence was later commuted to transportation for life and he sailed to NSW on the Guildford in August 1811. He died in 1813 aged 35. NSWBDM

Possible marriage: Lydia Bennett m. Thomas Field at St Martin in the Fields (Trafalgar Square), London in 1790

1814 – Convict, on stores, hospital nurse, Sydney M

1819 – (with or assigned to ) T. Smith M

1819 – Died 27 December, aged 50. Rev. Cowper’s burial returns, St Philips, Sydney, (ship recorded incorrectly as Glatton) CS

1821 – Still showing in convict lists with ToL

Sources:
Pallott’s Marriage Index, 4 February 1790, ancestry.com.au
Old Bailey 5 December 1810
CS Burial return for quarter ended 31 December 1819, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 11 April 1810
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 27
Sentence: 7 years

Margaret was caught stealing two teapots and a teapot stand, valued at 10 shillings, from a cutlers and japan shop at 25 Queen Street in Westminster, London. The value of the goods was reduced by the court to under 5 shillings to avoid a more severe sentence.

1812 – 28 February, Margaret Fitzgerald m. John Ingle, convict, Ann, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS (John Ingle was tried in Cambridge, 14 years)

1814 – Convict, off stores, wife to John Ingle, Parramatta M

1822 – Parramatta M

1825 – FBS, housekeeper, Sydney; John Ingle, CP, labourer, Parramatta, Ann 1810, 14 years M

1828 – Recorded as Margt. Fitzpatrick, aged 50, servant to John Redman, Killarney, Pitt Town CEN (John Redman, a former convict, resigned as Chief Constable of Sydney in 1825. He was also a shipowner and landholder.)

Sources:
Old Bailey 11 April 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1812, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 19 September 1810
Crime: Theft
Age: 12
Sentence: 7 years
Tried as Eleanor Flynn

Eleanor was a house servant to John Cave, a cheesemonger, who lived at 140 Whitecross Street. She stole four yards of lace, some pins and a £2 banknote from a box belonging to Cave’s sister Elizabeth Mountcastle. Some of the items were found in her pockets that she had left on a bed at her mother’s house. Her mother, Catherine King, was also charged with receiving stolen property but was found not guilty.

1811 – Assigned to Lieut. William Lawson, Parramatta M

1814 – Convict, off stores, servant to Lieut. Lawson, Parramatta. M (She was assigned to him until 1815 CS).

1819 – Elen Flinn, (with or assigned to) John (Jno) ? M

1821 – 13 and 20 January, Eleanor Flynn advertised in the Sydney Gazette that she was leaving the colony in the Dromedary and all claims on her were to be presented. The ship sailed on 10 February and arrived in England at the end of June.

It looks like Eleanor was one of only two women on the Friends who returned to England.

Possible marriage: Eleanor Flynn m. Barnaby McMahon 7 August 1821 at St Andrews in Holborn, Eleanor signed with a cross

Sources:
Old Bailey 19 September 1810
CS: List of servants assigned to Lieut. Lawson, dated 21 May 1823, NRS 897, Reel 6058; 4/1771 pp.313c
Marriage, 21 March 1821, www.ancestry.com.au

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Julianna

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 19 September 1810
Crime: Highway robbery
Age: 21
Sentence: 7 years

James Escombe told the court that Ann came up to him late at night in Holborn, near the Coach and Horses Inn and put her arm around him. He realised immediately she had taken his watch. He reached out to grab her; Ann cried murder and Escombe cried out that he had been robbed. She got away when two Hackeny coachmen stopped and restrained Escombe. A week later, Escombe went in search of her with his landlord and found Ann in a nearby inn. She ran away again to a house in Shorts Gardens and they followed her and made her accompany them to the watchhouse. The watch was not found.

1812 – “Julianna” Franklin buried 16th June, aged 24, Windsor, Rev. Cartwright’s burial returns CS

Sources:
Old Bailey 19 September 1810
CS: Burial return for quarter ended 30 June 1812, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898 Reel 6024 2/8298

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 11 April 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 33
Sentence: 7 years
Transportation register: Wife of William French

Mary lodged at 137 Gravel Lane with her husband William, who was a watchman at the docks. The landlady Rebecca Foster had not wanted Mary there as she had been in trouble previously but her husband had “begged hard” and she had relented. Mary stole a wash tub, candlestick coconut shell and a bootjack from the house and took some of them to an old iron shop to sell. Mrs Foster recognised some of the items when she visited a woman along the street who had purchased them. Mary was arrested for theft. Mary and William had both been before the court in July 1806, charged with breaking and entering and theft, but they were acquitted. The record of that trial mentioned they had a daughter. Mary was also found not guilty of theft on another occasion in February 1810. It is possible that Mary travelled on the Friends with her young son. See John William French

1806 – Approximate birth year of son John William French in London

Van Diemen’s Land:

1813 – 16 September, sailed for the Derwent (Hobart) from Sydney in the Mary and Sally with husband William French

1822 – September, on list of convicts in VDL

1827 – 3 February, Certificate of Freedom issued, Archives of Tasmania

1832 – 15 November William French, aged 72 years, and son John William, aged 26, both of Collins Street, Hobart, were both buried

Husband Wiliam’s burial record shows he arrived in Van Diemen’s Land as a free person on the Mary and Sally, a vessel engaged in the whaling and sealing industries. Two years earlier, in July 1811, a man named William French had departed from Sydney in the Sydney Cove on a whaling voyage. That ship had arrived in NSW from England in April 1809 and was then engaged in a succession of whaling voyages from Sydney. It is possible therefore that Mary’s husband had actually ceased working on the docks and had instead left London as a crewman on the Sydney Cove several years before she appeared at the Old Bailey.

 From at least April 1820, William French worked in Hobart as a waterman, ferrying passengers from Hobart to Kangaroo Point.

 After the death of her husband and son, it is possible Mary remarried. A widow Mary French married widower William Long in Hobart on 5 October 1835.

 There are further references to men named William French in the colonial records; one man was given permission to settle and receive a land grant on 21 August 1817, but no definite links can be made between them and Mary French.

 Sources:

Old Bailey 2 July 1806
Old Bailey 21 February 1810
Old Bailey 11 April 1810
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)
Claims and Demands, Sydney Gazette,13 July 1811, 7 August 1813
Henry Goulburn to Gov Macquarie, 21 August 1817, p. 477, Vol. 9, HRA
Government and General Orders, Hobart Town Gazette, 1 April 1820, 11 November 1820
Will of William French
Burial of William French and John William French, 15 November 1832, Name Index, Tas
Marriage to William Long, 5 October, 1835, Name Index Tas

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 31 October 1810
Crime: Theft
Age: 19
Sentence: Death, later commuted to 7 years
Native place: Chatham

Sarah was servant to Rebecca Matthews and lived in her house at Wine Office Court, Fleet Street. Matthews found 16 yards of woollen cloth, worth £16, in Sarah’s room and called the constable. Matthews said Sarah had conducted herself honestly up until then. Sarah finally admitted the cloth had come from the house where her sister Mary Shearman worked as a housemaid, owned by woollen cloth manufacturers at Blackwell Hall. Sarah said Mary gave her the cloth but Mary later denied any knowledge of it. Both sisters were arrested for theft. Mary was found not guilty and Sarah was sentenced to death, later commuted to 7 years’ transportation.

Sarah’s sister Mary Shearman was convicted and tried on the same day of a separate theft and was also transported on the Friends.

1813 – 2 March, Sarah Fussel m. Abraham Herne St Johns, Parramatta, Rev Marsden’s marriage returns CS, NSWBDM

1814 – Sarah Fussill off stores, wife to R Heron, free, carpenter, Parramatta; 1 child M

1822 – Sarah Fassall, wife to A Hearn, Liverpool; Children aged 14, 6, 4 and one with no age given, all born colony M

1825 – Sarah Hearne, FBS, wife of Abraham Hearn, landholder, Bringelly; Children: Charles aged 9, Elizabeth (no age given) , William aged 8 M

1828 – Sarah Hearn, aged 32, FBS, wife of Abraham Hearn, 47, CP, Glatton 1801, life, protestant, tenant, Cabramatta; Children: Charles aged 12, Anna aged 10, William aged 6, Martha aged 3 CEN

1835 – 15 June, Certificate of Freedom issued, No 35/708, Wife of Abraham Hearne of the Parramatta Road, housekeeper, native place: Chatham, born 1793, housekeeper, four feet 11 ½ “ tall, ruddy complexion, hair black lined with grey, grey eyes CF

1862 – 25 December, died aged 79, Concord, Sydney

The names and ages of Sarah’s children provided in the musters and census are confusing. In NSWBDM births of children to Sarah and Abraham are recorded for William in 1814 and 1822, Charles in 1816 and Martha in 1823 and 1825. According to a family history website, their children were William (b. 1814 d. 1821), Charles (b. 1816), Abraham (b. 1822, d. 1822), Martha (b. 1825) and William (b. 1826).

The age recorded for Sarah at her death does not match other records, including the Old Bailey record.

Sources:
Old Bailey 31 October 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1813, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898 Reel 6024
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Susannah Noon

See Susan Noon

Also known as Mary Gamble

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 18 July 1810
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: Given as 13
Sentence: Death, later commuted to transportation for life

Esther lodged in Home Street, Marylebone. She stole a quantity of lace worth £40 to £50 from a shop in Berkeley Square. The shop owner Charles Harris had noticed her acting suspiciously in his shop but did not notice that the lace was missing until later. He reported the theft to the constables. Esther sold some of the lace to a shop in Wandsworth and a lace veil to a house in Cold Bathfields. A pawnbroker became suspicious when Esther visited him on three consecutive days with a succession of items and he called the police. They connected the lace to the theft from Berkeley Square. Esther confessed to the theft – she was wearing one of the lace veils when the constables took her into custody – and led them to the places she had sold the goods. Because of her youth and her confession, her death sentence was commuted to transportation for life. It was noted that her mother was in the House of Correction.

Esther was more like 16 years old when she was tried. She had been before the courts twice before: the first time in 1805 for the theft of a pair of shoes when she was let off because the complainant did not turn up in court, and again in November 1809 when her age was also given as 13 and she was fined 1 shilling and sentenced to six month’s hard labour in the House of Correction.

Her mother Ann Gamble had been sentenced to death in September 1809 for the theft of a watch from the house in St James Street. Her sentence was commuted to 12 months in the House of Correction and she was still there when Esther was convicted in the middle of 1810. Ann had lived at 28 Cato Street.

While there were several baptisms recorded for Esther Mary Gamble in London in the relevant time period, Ann Gamble said her husband was from Wiltshire and she had told one of the witnesses who appeared at her trial that she was from St Mary Devises. The 1805 trial record for Esther also gave her birthplace as Wiltshire (and her age as 18). There was a Mary Gamble baptised on 20 April 1794 in Melksham, seven miles from Devises, born to Thomas Hunt Gamble and his wife Ann (nee Fillis), however, there is no definitive connection to this baptism.

1812 – 7 March, Esther M Gambol m. Robert Rope, St Matthews, Windsor, Robert Cartwright’s marriage returns, CS (Robert Rope born colony 30 October 1788)

1814 – Esther Mary Gamble, convict, off stores, wife to R Rope, Windsor; 2 children M

1822 – Esther Gamboll, FBS, Parramatta; Child aged 8 months M

1824 – 14 December, Seeks permission to marry Charles Probert, Tottenham, in Roman Catholic church CS,

Probert died January 1825 in Port Macquarie

1825 – Esther Gamble, ToL, housekeeper, Parramatta; Elizabeth aged 10 M

According to family websites Robert Rope left Esther and their family and went to Tasmania. He is said to have drowned on a whaling trip in 1835. It remains unclear how many children Esther had to Rope, but two were recorded in the 1814 muster. Family websites suggest they had George (b. 1815), John (b. 1816) and William (b. 1818); no information is available about the two older children. Esther is said to be the Mary Rope who went on to have two children with John Bevan. They were Eliza Jane born in 1822 and Elizabeth born in 1824. Despite this, Esther applied to marry Probert at the end of 1824. Both of her girls, then aged 4 and 1, were placed in the Female Orphan School (surnames recorded as Rope) on 30 September 1825. Both children were still there in 1828. The Elizabeth recorded as 10 years old in the 1825 muster perhaps should have been more correctly recorded as one year old.

The death of Esther remains ambiguous. Mary Rope, aged 51, died in April 1825 in Parramatta. Mary Gamble, aged 42, died in 1841. Family websites suggest the earlier death is the right one and the age was incorrect. If she was the child born in Merksham and baptised in 1794, she would have been 31 when she died. Esther cannot be found in the 1828 Census.

Sources:
Esther Mary Gamble, Criminal Register for England, 4 December 1805, www.ancestry.com.au
Old Bailey 4 December 1805
Old Bailey 1 November 1809
Old Bailey 18 July 1810
Old Bailey 20 September 1809 (Ann Gamble)
CS: Marriage return for quartered ended 31 March 1812, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Request to marry, 14 December 1824, NRS 937, Reel 6004-6016
Family history site (1)
Family history site (2)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Winchester Lent Assizes, Hampshire, 5 March 1810
Crime: Murder
Age: 20
Sentence: Death, commuted to transportation for life

Among all of the women on the Friends, Joanna was convicted of the most serious crime. William Sweetman, a shoemaker, was found dead in his bedroom in Southampton in December 1809. His throat had been cut and he had 17 stab wounds. The jury determined that he had either inflicted the injuries on himself in the presence of Joanna or she inflicted them. Either way, she was found guilty. A report in the The Times of London commented on her remarkable composure throughout her trial and when the verdict was delivered, Joanna curtsied to the judge and retired “unagitated”. Goff was a stranger in Southampton and her connection to Sweetman was not recorded. Sweetman’s wife was absent from the house at the time of his death but she reported that several items, including some linen, were missing from the house.

1814 – Convict, on stores, Factory, Parramatta M

1815 – 8 March, Johanna Goff, 24, m. John Griffiths, 37, free, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS, NSWBDM

1822 – Convict, Factory, Parramatta M

1822 – 4 June, Charged with escape from the Factory, to be sent to Factory, Parramatta on 5 June. Name appears as Gough, GD

1823 – February, To be sent to Factory, GD

1824 – 31 December, assigned to John Bartlett, Clarence Street, Sydney CS

1825 – 8 October, Johanna Gough, at large without legal authority and guilty of improper conduct, to be sent to the Factory 10 November GD

1825 – Convict, Factory, Parramatta M

1826 – 25 February, Hannah Goff, prisoner, absenting herself from her service, to be sent to the Factory 27 February GD

1826 – Patrick Murphy sentenced for assault on 24 February with intent to violate the person of Joanna Gough, guilty. Sydney Gazette 18 March

1827 – 27 August, Joanna Goff, Sydney, absenting herself without leave, to be sent to the Factory 3rd class for one month, 3 September GD

1828 – Aged 39, Catholic, housekeeper employed by Richard Donohoe, Castle Hill, GS (recorded as Johannah Goffe, Johanne Goffe) CEN

Sources:
Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle, 25 December 1809
The Times, 15 March 1810 p. 2
Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle, 12 March 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 21 March 1815, NRS 898, Reel 6024; On list of assigned prisoners, 31 December 1824, NRS 898, Reels 6020-6040,6070

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

nee Rebecca Dear

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 1 November 1809
Crime: Theft
Age: 29
Sentence: 7 years

Rebecca was servant to John and Frances Few in West Green Lane, Tottenham. Mrs Few went to Brighton for a month towards the end of August. Her husband joined her for the last two weeks. When they returned, Mrs Few found a number of items missing from the house including four sheets, a table cloth, a breakfast cloth, a napkin, 36 quarts of gooseberry and currant wine, 19 yards of dimity, ½ yard of muslin and a mattress. She confronted Rebecca and gave her a week or so to confess but she claimed she was innocent. Some of the cloth was found in Rebecca’s room, along with some caps made from the muslin.

Rebecca had married John Golsby on 8 July 1800 at St Marys Church, Hemel Hempstead. She travelled on the Friends with her three-year old son William. Three older children had died, William, James and Mary Ann (d. aged 18 months, 1806, St Albans). See William Golsby

1812 – Approximate birth year of daughter Mary Ann

1814 – Rebecca Goldsmith, convict, on stores, “wife’ to Joseph Tuso (Scarborough, free, on stores, constable), Sydney; 2 children on stores M

1819 – Rebecca Gawsberry, (with) Joseph Tusoo; 3 children, off stores M

1822 – Rebecca Golesby, FBS, wife of J Tuso, Sydney; Children: William (14) came free; Mary Ann (10) , Priscilla (7), Johanna (4) all born colony M

1825 – Rebecca Golsby, FBS, widow: children: William (17) and Mary Ann (13) came free; Priscilla (10) and Johanna (7) born colony M

1825 – Joseph Tuzo died aged 56 NSWBDM

1828 – Rebecca Goulby FBS, aged 45, charwoman ,Kent St, Sydney; Lodgers: Priscilla Tuzo (16) and Johanna Tuzo (12) CEN

1831 – 19 April, Rebecca died aged 45 NSWBDM

Rebecca did not marry first fleeter Joseph Tuso to whom she had two daughters. Tuso had been convicted of a highway robbery when he was 14 committed late at night in a churchyard in Stepney. Tuso had put his hand over the victim’s mouth to stop him shouting out while another man stole his cane and some money. For his part in the crime, Tuso was sentenced to death, which was commuted later to transportation for life to Africa. He was sent to New South Wales in the first fleet of convicts instead where by 1814 he was a constable in Sydney.

The ages given in the NSW records for Rebecca’s daughter Mary Ann indicate she was born in 1812 in NSW, though there is some confusion about this: she is shown as “born colony” in 1822 and as “came free” in 1825. It is unclear who was her father.

Rebecca features in a fictionalised account of her life with Joseph Tuso written by her descendant Kevin Golsby, entitled “Once More to be Free.” The book uses the framework of known facts.

Sources:
Old Bailey 1 November 1809
Once More to be Free

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Cumberland Easter Quarter Sessions, Carlisle, 1 March 1810
Crime: Petit larceny
Age: unknown
Sentence: 7 years

Sarah was described in court in Carlisle as a single woman, late of the Parish of St Cuthbert. She was tried and convicted by jury with Elizabeth Jones and Jane Dixon, also of the same place, for stealing eight yards of printed calico valued at 10p, the goods of William Ross, and three pieces of thread lace valued at 10p, the goods of Thomas Dent. The 12 jurors included a painter, two joiners, a shoemaker, breeches maker, glazier, farrier, innkeeper, saddler, gardener, grocer and a gunsmith. All three women were sentenced to transportation and travelled on the Friends.

1814 – Convict, off stores, servant to James Badgery (CF, Walker,landholder), Parramatta M

Sarah remains on the convict lists for NSW until 1821, though these lists were not very reliable. Little more can be found about her.

She is one of several contenders on the Friends who could be “Sarah Lamb” who requested permission to marry Thomas Farrel, in the Hawkesbury in February 1813. The wedding itself did not take place. There was a Sarah Farrel who died in 1813 aged 40. Although it was 87 miles from Carlisle, there was a Sarah Lamb who married Nicholas Graham at Alnwick, Northumberland on 6 August 1802 (notwithstanding the fact that Sarah Graham was recorded as single at her trial.)

Sources:
Easter Quarter Sessions 1810, CQ11 Session Papers, Indictments; Abstract Book CQ3/3. Cumbria Archive Service
Cumberland Pacquet, 15 May 1810, p. 3

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Hertford Assizes, 8 August 1810
Crime: Breaking and entering
Age: 43
Sentence: 7 years

Ann Hale aged 43, of Hatfield, was convicted for breaking and entering a dwelling house and taking a watch worth £2 and a seal and key, worth 1 shilling 6p, the property of William Wilshere.

1814 – Ann Hill, convict, single, on stores, in government employ, single, Windsor M

1819 – Ann Hall, (with) S…(indecipherable) M

1822 – Ann Hole, FBS wife of S Jones, Sydney M

1825 – FBS, wife of S Jones, Sydney M

1825 – 7 February, Certificate of Freedom 32/3155 reissued in lieu of No. 5/2046 returned mutilated and cancelled. No further details provided. CF

Samuel Jones was either the man who came on the Tottenham or Samuel Jones who in 1828 was aged 49, FBS, York Street, Somersetshire.

Sources:
Transported Beyond the Seas, by Ken Griffin, Hertfordshire Family History Society
www.rootschat.com

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Kent Quarter Sessions, Dover, 24 August 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 27
Sentence: 7 years

1812 – 28 December, Elizabeth Hall married Joseph Hansell, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns, CS Hansell was convicted for breaking and entering (burglary) at the Old Bailey in November 1809, aged 19, sentenced to death and commuted to transportation for life.

1814 – Convict, off stores, Windsor, one of seven female servants to William Cox; 1 child; Joseph Hansell, off stores, Admiral Gambier, servant to William Cox M

1814 – 24 March, Daughter Caroline Hansell died aged 10 months, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev Cartwright’s burial returns CS

1814 – Son William Hansell born NSWBDM

1818 – 11 November, Elizabeth Allen died, aged 35, free, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s burial returns CS

Elizabeth was shown in the convict lists until 1821 with her ToL, but these lists are not reliable.

Sources:
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1812, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Burial return for quarter ended 31 March 1814, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Burial return for quarter ended 31 December 1818, St Johns Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 6 December 1809
Crime: Larceny
Age: 39 years
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: Newry, County Down, Ireland

Different trial date of 9 December in CR, age 40

Elizabeth had her boy with her when she took 11 red cotton handkerchiefs, valued at 22 shillings, from the shop window of Henry Bowick’s, linen draper, in Tottenham Court Road. She had come into the shop to ask the price of a half-handkerchief for her son, but the draper informed her that he never cut them. A neighbouring shopkeeper saw her take the linen and he immediately informed Bowick, who then chased Elizabeth up the street. When he overtook her in Bedford Square she dropped the handkerchieves from under her clothes. “She begged that I would not prosecute her on account of her children,” Bowick later told the court.

It looks like she was the Elizabeth Harvey, aged 40, who was also before the judge on 20 September 1809 for stealing 5 yards of oilcloth from outside the door of John Walters in Clare Street, Clare Market. She told the court she had three small children to provide for by char work; her husband was at sea. She was sentenced to six months’ hard labour in the House of Correction.

There is no evidence that any children travelled with her on the Friends.

1813 – 2 November, Elizabeth Harvey, aged 28, m. Wm Williams, free, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns, CS

1814 – Convict, off stores, wife to W. Williams, Windsor; William Williams, Coromandel 2, free (FBS), off stores, landholder. M

1819 – (with) William Williams M

1820 – FBS, (with) William Williams, Windsor M

1822 – Lodger with Wm Williams, ToL, Sydney M

1824 – 12 October, to be admitted to the general hospital, CS

1824 – 21 October, Certificate of Freedom No. 51/2876 issued in lieu of 50/387 returned mutilated and cancelled, aged 40, needle worker, 5 feet ¾ “ tall, pale ruddy complexion, black hair, blue eyes, married to William Williams, labourer, of Castlereagh Street, Sydney, native place; Newry CF

1825– Wife of Wm Williams, Sydney M

It is not obvious which person is Elizabeth in the 1828 Census. The age given at her trial is inconsistent with the ages given in NSW. Elizabeth may have either exaggerated her age at the Old Bailey to avoid transportation or reduced her age in NSW to appear more marriageable.

Sources:
Old Bailey 20 September 1809
Old Bailey 6 December 1809
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1813, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Request for hospital admission, 12 October 1824, NRS 937, Reels 6004-6016, p. 548

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Alias Elizabeth McCartney

Convicted: Lancaster Assizes, 24 March 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 29
Sentence: 7 years

Elizabeth stole a piece of flannel, valued at 20 shillings, from the shop of Robert Lawson, woollen draper, on 24 February 1810. The draper was also the town clerk.

A bid was made for clemency on grounds of her previous good character; the fact that she was very contrite; her husband had been at sea for many years and had not returned; and she was in bad health. It was claimed that she had been forced into the crime by a man named as Gideon Gates. It had been assumed by the 15 supporters who signed a petition on her behalf – “long neighbours to the prisoner” – that she would have been simply given a prison sentence, otherwise more people would have spoken on her behalf in court. The file referred to her as Hodgson, alias McCartney. The recommendation was ‘no mercy’.

1814 – Convict, off stores, servant to Mr Fitzgerald, Windsor M
Richard Fitzgerald was commissioner of public works in Windsor at the time and had extensive land holdings. He was later superintendent of agriculture at Emu Plains penal settlement.

1814 – 3 July, sought permission to marry CS

1814 – 17 July, Elizabeth Hodgson, 34, m. Thomas Buck, 34, Wellington, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns CS

1817 – Thomas Buck died, aged 37 NSWBDM

1819 – Elizabeth Hodson, widow M

1820 – FBS, Castlereagh and Evans districts M

1821 – 28 November, Elizabeth Buck m. Thomas Hinton, free, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Samuel Marsden’s marriage returns CS Recorded as Thomas Linton: NSWBDM

1822 – Elizabeth Hodges, FBS, Parramatta M

1825 – Wife of ? Hinton, Parramatta M

1825 – Elizabeth appears twice in the 1825 muster: Eliza Hinton, FBS, Female Factory M

1826 – Elizabeth Hinton died aged 46 NSWBDM

Sources:
The National Archives, Kew, England, HO/47/45/9, UK
CS: Permission to marry, 3 July 1815, NRS 937, Reel 6004 4/3494, p. 108; Marriage return for quarter ended 31 July 1815, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1821, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Surrey Assizes, Southwark, 28 March 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 17 or 20
Sentence: 7 years

Elizabeth had been before the courts a number of times in the latter half of 1809. She used the same modus operandi each time. She would go to the houses of people she knew to be absent and present herself to the servants as a relative to the master or mistress. In this manner, she stole watches, spoons, snuff boxes – all small items that she could easily pawn. At one hearing in September 1809 there were 20 charges laid against her by various householders. Items were recovered at local pawnbrokers.

1812 – 6 August, Elizabeth Holland m. James Smith, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS

1813 – Son James born NSWBDM

1814 – Convict, off stores, wife to James Smith, Parramatta, convict, off stores; 2 children M

1819 – 3 children, (with) J. Smith M

1822 – FBS, wife of J. Smith, Parramatta M

1825 – FBS, wife of J. Smith, Parramatta M

1828 – Elizabeth Smith, aged 35, FBS, married to James, aged 53, CP, Indian 1810, protestant, publican, Parramatta; Children: James, aged 16, Maria aged 15, Sophia aged 13, Sarah aged 11, Elizabeth aged 9, Jane aged 4, William aged 1 ½ CEN

1829 – James Smith died on 28 August, Bunnerong

1830 – 26 July, Elizabeth Smith issued licence to retail “wines and malt and spiritous liquers” at The Cross Keys, Parramatta, amount of duty paid £25.  JPs J. Harris, Edmund Lockyer, Jon Palmer and William Lawson certified her as fit person to keep a public house

1831 to 1834 – further liquor licences issued to Elizabeth Smith 

1846 – Elizabeth died 10 November, widow of Sussex Street, Sydney, burial 12 November at St Andrews NSWBDM

1846 – 12 November, Sydney Gazette: “On Tuesday morning last, at the residence of her son in law, Mr William Marshall, brass founder, Sussex St., Mrs Elizabeth Smith, relict to the late Mr James Smith formerly of The Cross Keys Parramatta in the 57th year of her age.” 

1847 – 6 February 1847, Bells Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer: Report of court case brought by William Marshall against his brother-in-law Thomas Doling, husband of Sophia Smith, for not paying his share of Elizabeth’s funeral expenses.

Sources:
The Morning Chronicle, London, 28 September 1809
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 September 1812, St Johns Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024
Publicans’ Licences, NSWSR, Reels 5049 to 5051
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Wiltshire Lent Assizes, 10 March 1810
Crime: Larceny from the person
Age: About 42
Sentence: 7 years

Also known as Charlotte Hopkins

Lucy was convicted at Salisbury of stealing banknotes to the value of £8 from the person of Robert Godby in Trowbridge. She picked his pocket on Wednesday 6 December 1809 and was caught the next day when she tried to pass on one or two of the notes.  She was sent to Fisherton Gaol on the outskirts of Salisbury to await trial at the next assizes and on her arrival there she was recognised as an old acquaintance of the gaol, formerly known as Charlotte.

1814 – Convict, off stores, single, Sydney M

1825 – FBS, housekeeper, Botany M

1828 – Lucy Hopkins died aged 60 NSWBDM

Sources:
The Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 11 December 1809, p. 4; 19 March 1810, p. 4

 

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Margaret McCormack

Convicted: Middlesex Goal Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 21 February 1810
Crime: Pocketpicking
Age: 29 years
Sentence: 7 years
Gaol report: An old offender, 18 previous convictions

Margaret Hughes lured a drunk Joseph Fleming back to the rooms she shared with Thomas Banks at 2 Church Yard, Whitechapel, and Banks picked his pocketbook and valuable jewelled watch worth £8. Eight days later, after she had drunk too much, Margaret dobbed in Banks for theft. The next day she begged the patrol officer not to take any notice of what she had said; she was terrified that Banks would murder her if he found out she had been loose with her tongue. The officer recovered the stolen watch from a local pawnbroker. Both Hughes and Banks were sentenced to seven years’ transportation.

Banks, aged 37 when he was convicted, sailed to NSW on the Guildford in August 1811.

According to family history websites, Hughes travelled on the Friends with three children, Charlotte, Caroline and Daniel. See Charlotte Hughes See Caroline Hughes See Daniel Banks

Van Diemen’s Land:

1812- 19 February, arrived Van Diemen’s Land (later Tasmania), transshipped from Sydney on the Ruby. Travelled with Banks to VDL

1814 – 21 March, charged with disorderly conduct, to be fed on bread and water for one week, to sit in the stocks three times during that period for one hour each time.

1814 – 12 April, Margaret McCormack m. Anthony Farrel, convict, Guildford, Hobart. Anthony Farrel was an alias of Thomas Banks

1814 – Living in Newtown, VDL; 4 children

1814 – 18 November, wife of Banks, charged with being drunk and disorderly, fined 5 shillings

1818 – 7 May, wife of Banks, charged with being drunk and disorderly, fined 5 shillings

1818 – 29 November, charged with being drunk and disorderly, fined 5 shillings

1820 – 14 August, charged with being drunk and disorderly, reprimanded

1820 – 25 August, charged with being drunk and disorderly, fined 5 shillings

1820 – 28 October, Notice in Hobart Town Gazette: “Whereas my wife, Margaret Banks having eloped from her home, without any just provocation, leaving me with her 5 small children. This is to give notice that I will not be responsible for any debts she may contract on my account. Thomas Banks.”

1821 – at Hobart

1821 – 29 May, FBS, charged with being drunk and disorderly and out after hours, reprimanded

1821 – 6 August, charged with stealing a waistcoat, the case was dismissed.

1822 – 6 December, died at Hobart

1823 – 29 December, on list sent from Colonial Secretary’s office of persons in VDL with confirmation of expiration of sentence CS

Margaret had 8 children – Charlotte (born c. 1806, London) , Caroline (born c. 1808, London), Daniel (born c. 1809, London), Amelia (born 1813, Hobart), Ann (born 1815, Hobart), Mary (born 1817/18), Anthony (born 1819, New Town) and Judith (born 1822). There is speculation on family websites that the oldest two girls, who used the surname Hughes, were her children to another man prior to meeting Banks. Her use of the names McCormack and Hughes suggest that McCormack was her maiden name.

In 1838, her youngest son Anthony was convicted as a bushranger and sentenced to hang.

Sources:
Old Bailey 21 February 1810
Transportation Register for the Guildford 1812, ancestry.com
Archives Office of Tasmania
CS: Main series of letters received 21 August 1822, NRS 897, 4/1759, p. 28; Copies of letter sent 18 September 1822, NRS 937, 4/3506, p. 285
Convict record Tasmanian State Archives
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)
“The Bushrangers,” Hobart Town Courier, 22 May, p. 6; “Execution,” ibid, 22 June, p. 3; ibid, 29 June 1838, p. 2
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Durham Assizes, 21 August 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 19
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: Newcastle

1812 – 21 February, sentenced to 12 months by bench at Windsor GD; 14 March, On list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle (NSW) per Estramina CS

1813 – 16 April, prisoner at Newcastle, her time expired. (listed as Irving) CS

1813 – 2 October, Sydney Gazette: escaped from Factory (notices appear in Sydney Gazette 16 October, 25 December, 8 January 1814, 12 February)

1814 – 29 April, On list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle per Endeavour for one year from 28 February CS

1817 – 29 November, mail for Mary Irwin, Sydney Gazette

1820 – 20 October, Requests permission to marry William Lack (appears as Sack) at Liverpool CS

1821 – 9 April, Mary Irwin, aged 30, free, m. William Lack, 35, Shipley, St Lukes, Liverpool, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns CS

1822 – Mary Irvine, FBS, wife of Mr Mack, Liverpool M

1822 – 30 August, Affidavit re loss of her Certificate of Freedom received in October 1817, had been destroyed by fire last year when her dwelling house caught fire in the district of Bringelly; Mary signed her name CS

1823 – 28 October, William Lack (alias Hipkin), Shipley ,1817, seeks permission from Sydney Gaol for his wife Mary Irwin to accompany him to Port Macquarie after a supposedly false charge was brought against him CS

1825 – FBS, washerwoman, wife of M Lake, Liverpool; William Hipkins, Shipley 1822, Life, government employment, Port Macquarie; Also shown as William Lack, alias Hipkin, Shipley 1817, 14 years, Port Macquarie M

1828 – 21 March, Certificate of Freedom 28/285 issued, in lieu of No 108/445 dated 31 August 1822 returned mutilated and cancelled; Servant, born 1790, 5 feet, fair ruddy complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes, native of Newcastle CF

Mary cannot be identified in the 1828 Census.

Sources:
CS: List of prisoners, 14 March 1812, NRS 936, Reel 6003, p. 112; Prisoner, 16 April 1813, NRS 897, Reel 6066, p. 125; List of prisoners, 29 April 1814, NRS 937, Reel 6004, p. 160; Permission to marry, 20 October 1820, NRS 937, Reel 6007, p. 301; Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1821, St Lukes, Liverpool, NRS 898, Reel 6025; Affidavit, 30 August 1822, NRS 898, Reel 6028, p. 8; Lack’s petition, 28 October 1823, NRS 900, Fiche 3234, p. 9

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Yorkshire Quarter Sessions, Kingston Upon Hull, 12 July 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 19
Sentence: 7 years

According to the Criminal Register, she was convicted at the May Quarter Sessions in 1810.

1814 – Convict, wife to Mr R. Tompson, off stores, Windsor M

1817 – Ticket of leave issued CI

1820 – FBS, (with) Robert Thompson (alias) Griffiths M

1822 – FBS wife of Wm Craig, Windsor M

1825 – FBS, living with Wm Craig, Wilberforce M

1828 – Anne Jackson, aged 37, FBS servant to Wm Craig; William Craig, aged 32, labourer, Morley 1817, Life, ToL, Lower Portland Head CEN

1830 – Ann Jackson m. William Craig, Sackville Reach NSWBDM

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Surrey Assizes, 28 March 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 22
Sentence: 7 years

1814 – Convict, off stores, single, Sydney; 1 child M

1815 – Daughter Mary E. born, father Charles King NSWBDM

1817 – Ticket of leave issued CI

1819 – Single; 4 children off stores M

1822 – 3 September, affidavit re loss of Certificate of Freedom, granted about five years ago; about 5 months previous it was torn by one of her children with other papers; Mary signed with x CS

1825 – FBS dealer, wife of C King Sydney M

1828 – aged 40, FBS, wife of Chas King, Harington St, Sydney; Charles King, aged 50, waterman, CP, Fortune 1812, Harington St; Children: Ann 15, Mary 13, Sarah 11, Charles 9, Eliza 7, Harriet 7, John 5, Jane 3, Elizabeth 6 mths CEN

Sources:
CS: Affidavit, 3 September 1822, NRS 898, Reel 6028, p. 10

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 9 January 1811
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 25
Sentence: 7 years

Mary claimed she was “innocent as a baby unborn” when she was tried for the theft of three pieces of ribbon. She had been caught taking the ribbon, worth 25 shillings, from the shop counter by a 16-year old shop assistant who worked for Thomas Smyth of 104 Ratcliffe Highway.

1812 – 9 April, inquest on body of Mary Jeffries, held at Kissing Point
Inquest report: She had been living with P. Thomas or Thomas Thomas and for several weeks, since the peach season, she had been drinking “very hard” of cider. For a week she had been complaining of pain in the pit of her stomach and through her shoulders to her back. She died in Thomas’ arms on the Tuesday evening prior to the inquest. CS

1812 – 10 April, Mary Flynn, aged 46, Friends, buried, St Philips, Sydney Rev. Cowper’s burial returns CS

1812 – 11 April, Sydney Gazette: “On Thursday an Inquest was taken at Kissing Point on the body of Mary Jeffries who died suddenly the day before. Verdict – Death by the Visitation of God. “

1814 – Records show a ToL was issued, probably automatically CI

While the inquest did not specifically refer to Mary Jeffries “of the Friends”, there is no evidence there was anyone else in the colony by that name at the time. There is also no record of Mary Jeffries, of the Friends, in any musters after 1812.

There is no record of the death of a Mary Jeffries in the NSWBDM. However, the death of a Mary Flinn is recorded. Rev. William Cowper’s burial returns record the death of Mary Flynn, aged 46, of the Friends, a native of London, who was tried at the Old Bailey and sentenced to seven years’ transportation. The age does not match that given at Mary Jeffries’ trial but it must be assumed that one of the ages is incorrect and that Mary Jeffries was also Mary Flynn.

Sources:
Old Bailey 9 January 1811
CS NRS 898, Reel 6021, 4/1819 pp 330-332, Burial return for quarter ended 30 June 1812, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Grace

Convicted: High Court of Justiciary, Edinburgh , 27 December 1808
Crime: Housebreaking, habit and repute
Age: About 26
Sentence: 7 years

Grizel was living in Port Seton, East Lothian, when she broke into a house and stole some washing.  The stolen items included children’s clothing, a muslin gown, a petticoat, another gown, a shawl, an apron, two pairs of stockings and several nightcaps.  She was found in Edinburgh with some of the goods, despite protesting her innocence.  It was her second or third offence. (This information has come from a family website.)

Grizel was pregnant on the voyage of the Friends and gave birth to her son John shortly after her arrival in Sydney. The dates suggest Grizel fell pregnant towards the end of February 1811, which was around the time the Scots women were being trans-shipped from Edinburgh to join the Friends at Woolwich in London.

1811 – 17 November, birth of son John Eddington, Sydney CS

1813 – Daughter Jane born

1814 – Grissill Johnson, free, on stores, wife to constable, Sydney M

1815 – Son Daniel born

1817 – Son Thomas MacFarlane born, father’s name: John MacFarlane, mother’s name: Grace

(John MacFarlane came on the Admiral Gambier in 1808, also convicted in Edinburgh)

1817 – Ticket of leave issued CI

1819 – Son John admitted to Male Orphan School, Sydney, born 17 November 1811, mother: Grizzle McFarlane, 3 Clarence Street, fishwoman CS

1819 – (with) John McFarlane; 4 children, off stores M

1822 – Grace Johnson, FBS, wife of Johnson, Windsor M

1823 – Daughter Mary Watson born, father: William Watson, mother: Grizel NSWBDM

1825 – Daughter Martha Watson born, father: William Watson, mother: Grizel NSWBDM

1825 – Convict, wife of Watson, shoemaker, Windsor; Son John, came free, Orphan School, Liverpool M

1828 – Grace Watson, aged 40, FBS; William Watson, aged 34, GS, Lord Eldon 1817, 14 years, shoemaker, Windsor; children: Jane aged 13, Daniel aged 11, Mary aged 5, Martha aged 3 CEN

1843 – 15 May, Buried under name of Grace Watson, aged 67

The ages given at various stages of Grizel’s life are inconsistent. Her age given at death suggests she was born in 1776. Her birthdate given on a family website is 1782. Her age given at the time of the 1828 Census would place her birth c. 1788.

The following is from a family history website:
Grizel was born 11 June 1782 to James Johnston and Jean(Jane) Bird in Tranent, East Lothian. This would put her nearer the age of 26 when she was living in Port Seton, in the parish of Tranent, East Lothian. Grizel had three children to John MacFarlane: Jane born c. 1813, Daniel born c. 1815 and Thomas born 10 October 1817.

Several entries on family history sites suggest Grizel gave birth to her eldest son John on board the Friends, however, the information provided in the records of the Male Orphan School contradicts this, providing the date of his birth in November 1811. The name of John’s father was given as Adam Eddington at John’s death in 1891 in Balmain. His mother’s name was given as Grace. There were several men called Adam Eddington in East Lothian when Grizel lived there.

Sources:
National Archives of Scotland: High Court of Justiciary, Edinburgh, 27 December 1808, JC8/6, JC4/4, JC26/338
Caledonian Mercury, 28 February 1811
CS: John Eddington, admitted to Male Orphan School 1 January 1819, NRS 898 4/7208
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Cumberland Quarter Sessions, Carlisle, 2 May 1810
Crime: Petit larceny
Age: About 23
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: Newcastle Upon Tyne

Elizabeth was described in court as the wife of Thomas Jones, labourer, late of the Parish of St Cuthbert. She was tried and convicted by jury with Jane Dixon and Sarah Graham, also of the same place, for stealing eight yards of printed calico valued at 10p, the goods of William Ross, and three pieces of thread lace valued at 10p, the goods of Thomas Dent. The 12 jurors included a painter, two joiners, a shoemaker, breeches maker, glazier, farrier, innkeeper, saddler, gardener, grocer and a gunsmith. All three women were sentenced to transportation and travelled on the Friends.

1814 – Eliz Jones, convict, off stores, ToL , single, Sydney M

1814 – ToL 738 CI

1817 – 18 February, Elizabeth issued Certificate of Freedom and granted an absolute pardon; Age 30, servant, 5 feet 5 ½”, fair complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes, native place: Newcastle upon Tyne, CoF No. 315, AP 315. Note on the CoF states: In consideration of good conduct and character and also of the short time remaining unexpired of her original sentence. CF AP

1817 – 8 March, Sydney Gazette: Elizabeth Jones leaving the colony in the ship Surrey, requests all claims and demands upon her may be presented

1817 – 9 May, Elizabeth Jones is on passenger list to leave Sydney in the Sir William Bensley bound for Bengal and then England. Note in passenger list says she is free by pardon but now also free by servitude, “her original sentence having expired on the 2nd May”.

1817 – Her name still appears in NSW Convict List.

It looks like Elizabeth was one of only two women on the Friends who returned to England.

It was a common practice for former convicts intending to return to England to seek confirmation of completion of their sentence from the Governor and the issue of a pardon, which in turn could be presented to authorities on arrival in England. An “absolute” pardon enabled Elizabeth to leave the colony.

Sources:
Easter Quarter Sessions 1810, CQ11 Session Papers, Indictments; Abstract Book CQ3/3. Cumbria Archive Service
Cumberland Pacquet, 15 May 1810, p. 3
L. Macquarie’s dispatch 1820 (1192 p. 826) Mitchell Library, NSW
NSW Departing Crew and Passenger Lists 1816-1825 www.ancestry.com

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 31 October 1810
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 21
Sentence: 7 years
Transportation register: Wife of John Johns

Mary was with Elizabeth Payne when they went into the shop of Robert Kenyon Hosier at 64 Holborn Hill. When they left the shop, the owner noticed a parcel of 12 pairs of silk stockings was missing, he had left it on a chair ready to be delivered to a customer. He went after the women and when he caught up with them in the street Mary dropped the parcel on the ground. The stockings had a value of £4 10 shillings. In court Mary said “ I know nothing about it no more than the baby in my arms”. Both Mary and Elizabeth travelled on the Friends to NSW.

Mary travelled on the Friends with her two sons John, aged 2, and Charles, aged 1. See John Jones See Charles Jones

1814 – Convict, on store, Factory, Parramatta; 2 children M

1817 – ToL issued CI

1819 – 1 January, John and Charles Jones admitted to Male Orphan School, Sydney; Mary Jones parent, seamstress, Macquarie St, Parramatta CS

1820 – Mary Jones m. Joseph Day, St Philips, Sydney NSWBDM

1822 – FBS, wife of Joseph Day, FBS, Wellington, labourer, Sydney M

1822 – 22 November, Mary Day’s petition to have her boys removed from Male Orphan School is rejected, CS

1828 – Mary, aged 37, Joseph aged 36, shopkeeper Windsor CEN

Mary’s trial and conviction at the Old Bailey feature in The Newgate Calendar, edited by Donal O Danachair, Vol. 5, published by the Ex-Classics Project, 2009.

Sources:
Old Bailey 31 October 1810
CS: Male Orphan School, NRS 796 [1]; Reel 2777; 1477, p. 2; NRS 898 4/7208; Petition, 22 November 1822, Reel 6040, 4/400 p. 50

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 6 June 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 45
Sentence: 7 years

Sarah was caught trying to remove a dress from a five-year girl, the daughter of Benjamin Morgan, who lived at the Horse-shoe Inn, Little Britain (Aldersgate). When she was taken to the local prison, she was found to also have a child’s velveteen jacket and trowsers. She had taken them on the same day from a little boy who lived on Saffron Hill. In court Sarah said: “Great distress drove me to what I have done, if your lordship will be merciful to me. I will leave London and never leave my native parish no more.”

1814 – Convict, off stores, single, Sydney M

1825 – FBS, housekeeper, Sydney M

Nothing more is known about Sarah. She was right at the cut-off age for women to be transported from England.

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Warwickshire Assizes, 29 March 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 20
Sentence: 7 years

1814 – Ann Dukes, convict, off stores, single, Sydney; 1 child M

1819 – Widow; 2 children, off stores M

1822 – 5 August, Ann Dukes, aged 32, m. William Beggs, aged 30, Gambier at St Johns, Parramatta, Rev Marsden’s marriage returns CS

1822 – FBS, wife of William Bigs, Sydney M

1822 – Ann appears twice in the muster: Ann Dukes, wife of W Biggs, Sydney M

1825 – Housekeeper, Sydney M

1825 – Ann appears twice in the muster: Ann Duke, FBS, wife of Wm Biggs, Sydney M

1828 – Ann Dukes, aged 34, FBS, housekeeper for Wm Beggs, Phillip St, Sydney; William Beggs, aged 40, CP, Life, Admiral Gambier 1810, blacksmith, Philip St; Children: Thomas aged 5, John aged 3 CEN

Sources:
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 September 1822, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Elizabeth King

Convicted: Surrey Quarter Sessions, Newington, 16 July 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 29
Sentence: 7 years
Criminal Register: listed as Elizabeth King

Elizabeth was tried as Kean, alias King, a spinster of Southwark St Saviour. On 29th May 1810 she was charged with stealing a quantity of wrappers and robes from Robert Gunson, woollen merchant of Princes Street, Southwark. She was said to have stolen the items with Hannah Jones, who was acquitted, and Elizabeth Williams, who was not charged. She was held in the Newington House of Correction.

1813 – 20 November, son William James Barnett born, Windsor (Mother’s name recorded as Ann NSWBDM)

1814 – Elizabeth King, Convict, off stores, single, Windsor; 1 child M

1814 – 24 October, Elizabeth King, aged 33, m. William Barnett, aged 30, free, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns CS

1817 – 14 May, daughter Ann Elizabeth born Windsor

1819 – Elizabeth Kean, (with) W Barns; 2 children M

1822 – Elizabeth King, FBS, wife of W Barnett, Sydney; William Barnett, came free, Active, merchant, Sydney; Daughter Elizabeth, BC, aged 4 M

1822 – Elizabeth appeared twice in the 1822 muster: Elizabeth Ring, wife of W Barnett, Sydney M

1825 – Elizabeth King, dead; Mary, aged 8, child of Eliz King, Sydney M*

1825 – William Barnett, came free, Active, householder, Sydney; Children: William, BC, aged 14; Elizabeth, BC, aged 8 M

Several family history websites quote a date of death for Elizabeth of 11 December 1822. No source has been provided and her burial cannot be located within the St Philips church register in Sydney or on NSWBDM. If she died in Sydney between 1822 and 1825 it appears she was buried under a different surname, perhaps her maiden name.

*It is not known if Mary King’s name was recorded incorrectly or even that she was the daughter of this Elizabeth. In the 1828 Census, there is a Mary King aged 9, who lived at 28 Gloucester St, Sydney, with the family of Richard Calcutt. His two daughters lived there too and were seamstresses.

Some family history websites have confused the identity of Elizabeth’s husband with that of another William Barnett who arrived on the Admiral Gambier in 1808. Instead, the NSW Census and Population Book for Sydney for 1822 (www.ancestry.com.au) confirms that Elizabeth’s husband was William Barnett who arrived free on the brig Active in 1810. He had a shop at 66 George Street in Sydney. After Elizabeth’s death he married Christiana Hadcock in 1827. The family is shown in the 1828 Census, but William’s ship is recorded incorrectly in the Census as the Henry, 1826.

Sources:
Surrey Quarter Sessions 1780-1820, Surrey History Trust, QS2/6/1810/MID/69
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1814, NRS 898, Reel 6024
William Barnett’s remarriage: Sydney Gazette, 10 January 1827, p. 2
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Sarah Keith

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 6 June 1810
Crime: Theft from a specified place
Age: 18
Sentence: 7 years
Old Bailey: Tried as Sarah Keith
Native place: London

Sarah worked as a charwoman and cleaned house for Henry and Elizabeth Raptey at 9 Cold Bath Square, St James, Clerkenwell. She stole two £1 notes, $2 (worth 10 shillings) and 2 shillings from a closet. When her mistress asked her if she had taken the money, Sarah said she had but she had got tipsy and lost it. Sarah wasn’t sure if she had been robbed of the money or not. As if to mitigate the charge, she told the Court that she did not take the money all at once.

1812 – 21 November, Sydney Gazette, Sarah Keep, servant to Mrs White at (Kissing Point) – has left her employment

1814 – Convict, off stores, single, Sydney M

1816 – 12 January, On list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle (penal settlement) per Estramina CS; convicted by D Wentworth Esq. on 2 January, sentenced to 1 year GD

1818 – 11 July, Sydney Gazette, notice that Capt Richard Siddins of the Brig Lynx intends to shortly quit the colony with his wife, and Sarah Keep and Ann Blaxton

1822 – FBS , wife of W or H Goodin, Sydney M

1825 – 6 October, Certificate of Freedom issued No. 95/4447 in lieu of no. 9/464 returned mutilated and cancelled; Age: 32, servant, 5 feet 1½ “ tall, ruddy complexion, black hair, dark eyes, native place: London CF

1825 – Wife of Goodin, Lane Cove M

Sarah cannot be located in the 1828 Census. No marriage can be found for her and no further information has been found about her husband.

Sources:
CS: Prisoners list, 12 January 1816, NRS 937, Reel 6004, p. 315

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Lancaster Quarter Sessions, 17 January 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 20
Sentence: 7 years

Elizabeth was convicted in Salford of stealing banknotes from William Scholfield in Manchester.

1811 – 2 December, Elizabeth Casher m. John Wainwright, St Philips, Sydney, Rev. Cowper’s marriage returns CS NSWBDM

1814 – Convict, on stores, Windsor, wife to S. Wainewright, Windsor; 1 child, on stores M

1820 – Betsy Casher, (with) Samuel Wainwright; 1 daughter M

1822 – Elizabeth Wainwright died aged 32 NSWBDM

Samuel Wainwright arrived as a convict on the Perseus in 1802, and was a sawyer in Windsor at the time of the 1814 muster. In the 1828 census John Wainwright is recorded as 53, Perseus, sawyer, North Richmond. It appears that John and Samuel are the same person. John Wainwright married Sarah Haslam, at Windsor in 1822, after Elizabeth’s death.

Sources:
Lancaster Gazette and General Advertiser, 27 January 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1811, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Buckinghamshire Assizes, 3 March 1810
Crime: Larceny from the person
Age: About 24 or 26
Sentence: Life

Hannah was convicted with John Moss at Aylesbury of stealing £60 in Bank of England notes, the property of Richard Randolph of Thame. John was also sentenced to transportation for life and was sent to NSW on the Admiral Gambier.  John at least was from Frome, Somerset.

1814 – Hannah Moss, convict, off stores, Sydney, wife to John Moss, convict, on stores, (assigned) to Mr Middleton; 1 child, off stores M

1817 – John Moss petitions for mitigation of his sentence CS

1818 – 31 January, John Moss issued Absolute Pardon; 5 feet 7 ½ “ tall, dark sallow complexion, black hair, hazel eyes, rather sickly, native place: Frome, Somerset AP

1819 – (with J. Moss) 2 children M

1822 – Hannah Moss, convict, 14 yrs, wife of John Moss, CP 14 yrs, Gambier, cooper, Sydney ; Children: James aged 7, Ann aged 4 M

1824 – John Moss died aged 47 NSWBDM

1824 – 3 May , Hannah Moss, widow of John Moss, cooper, application to have John McLoughlin, cooper, Martha 1818, assigned to her. Her petition was supported by a reference from Rev. Richard Hill who said her husband had died some days earlier and she needed assistance to continue his well established business to support her family. CS

1824 – 5 May, Hannah was referred to the chief engineer for assistance. CS

1825 – Hannah Moss , CP, wife of John; children James aged 11, Ann aged 7, born colony. John Moss still appeared in the muster as householder, life, CP, Pitt St , Sydney. M

1825 – Hannah appeared twice in the 1825 muster: Hannah Moss, convict, 14 yrs, widow, Sydney; children: James, Mary, John, William all BC M

1826 – Son James died aged 12 NSWBDM

1826 – 8 March, Hannah Moss, in Entrance Book, Sydney Gaol GD

1826 – 15 March, Hannah Moss, free , a reputed prostitute, to the Factory for three months GD

1826 or

1828 – Hannah Moss died aged 42, NSWBDM (two entries)

A marriage record for John and Hannah Moss in England has not been located.

Sources:
Northampton Mercury, 10 March 1810, p. 3
The Bath Chronicle, 22 March 1810, p. 4
CS John Moss’ petition: (no date) 1817, NRS 900 4/1852, p. 248; Hannah’s application: 3 May 1824, NRS 897 4/1779 p. 51. 5 May 1824, NRS 937 4/3511, p. 117

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 6 June 1810
Crime: Violent theft
Age: 24
Sentence: 7 years

Mary was tried with Elizabeth Durant who also travelled on the Friends. Elizabeth picked up a man in the street and took him to the Turk’s Head where she drank gin. William Gardener was a waterman from Gloucestershire with a wife and family at home. Elizabeth told him it would cost half a crown to spend the night with her and he accepted. She took him back to her rooms in Church Lane, St Giles, where she asked him for 18p to pay for her lodging. Gardener handed over more money to pay for some liquor and Elizabeth called on Mary and Elizabeth Ellis to fetch it. Gardener fell asleep and when he awoke he found his watch gone, along with 9 shillings and a bundle of clothes he had with him. The women were still in the room and Gardener placed himself against the door to prevent them escaping until they surrendered his belongings. By morning, Mary was all for murdering him and she took up a large pair of bellows, Elizabeth took up an iron bar and Mary Ellis a pewter pot. Together the women attacked Gardener. He managed to escape out the door and find a night watchman to assist him. All three women were arrested and convicted and sentenced to transportation.

Mary had been before the courts at least twice before. In June 1809 she was charged with two other women in similar circumstances and found guilty of the theft of man’s watch. She was fined 1 shilling and sentenced to six months’ hard labour in the House of Correction. In April 1810 Mary was found not guilty of the theft of a watch from a man in Diot Street.

1814 – Convict, off stores, lives with J. Fowler, Windsor M

1816 – Mary Kite m. John Fowler, St Matthews, Windsor NSWBDM

1820 – Mary Ann Kite, FBS, (with) Robert Fowler, Windsor M

1822 – FBS, wife of J Fowler, Windsor; John Fowler, came free, Star, landholder and carpenter, six acres of cleared land, 8 hogs, 3 ½ acres in wheat M

1825 – Mary Ann Kite, wife of John Fowler, Wilberforce ; Son William aged 6, born colony M

1828 – Kite Fowler, aged 42, FBS, wife of John, aged 61, CF, Star 1808, carpenter Pitt Town CEN

Sources:
Old Bailey 26 June 1809
Old Bailey 11 April 1810
Old Bailey 6 June 1810

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 9 January 1811
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 27
Sentence: 7 years

Sophia stole a quilt, a blanket, pair of sheets, and a tablecloth from a woman’s lodgings. The landlord found some of the items at a local pawnbroker and, with an officer, apprehended Sophia when she returned to redeem some items. The two men went with her back to her lodgings in Artillery Street and found the quilt and sheets. A man was in her rooms but Sophia would not say if he lived with her and she would not stop crying. In court, Sophia called one witness who gave her a good character.

1813 – 23 September, convicted by Government CS

1813 – 4 October, on list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle per Estramina, duration at pleasure of government CS

1816 – 1 June, prisoner at Newcastle. Proceeding to Sydney NSWSR

1819 – Single M

1822 – FBS, wife of W Bush, Sydney; William Bush, CP, Glatton, life, brass founder, Sydney M

1825 – 11 and 26 October, requests permission to marry Thomas Parker, per Morley, at Sydney CS

1825 – Sophia Knowles m. Thomas Parker, St James, Sydney NSWBDM

1828 – FBS, aged 37, housekeeper Thos Parker, Philip St; Thomas Parker , aged 30, ToL, Morley 1817, 14 yrs, shoemaker in Philip St CEN

1832 – Sophia Parker died aged 40 NSWBDM

Records of Sophia’s age in NSW were not consistent with the age recorded at her trial. 

Sources:
Old Bailey 9 January 1811
CS: Conviction and prisoner: 4 October 1813, NRS 936 4/3492, p. 275; Permission to marry: 11 October 1825, NRS 897 4/1788, p. 22, 26 October 1825, NRS 937 4/3515, p. 412
NSWSR: 1 June 1816, Reel 6066; 4/1806 p.26

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 21 February 1810
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 18
Sentence: Death, later commuted to transportation for life

Ann was charged with Sarah May who also travelled on the Friends. The two young women had shoplifted some 28 yards of printed cotton and 7 yards of other cotton in the shop of John Thwaites linen draper in Upper Holborn. Ann hid the cloth under her petticoats and the draper saw it when it fell to the floor. He apprehended both women and took them to a back room to await a constable. Sarah tried to escape by climbing over a wall in the yard but was stopped by a neighbour. When the police finally arrived to arrest them, Ann hit out at the shop girl as she was escorted out of the shop, then turned and kicked Thwaites “at a certain part, which caused such pain, I was not able to rise for two hours”.

1813 – 6 April, Edward Main applies to marry Ann Culp from Parramatta Factory and remove her from government stores CS

1813 – Ann Kolp m. Edward Main, St Johns, Parramatta NSWBDM

1814 – Ann Colp, off stores, wife to Edward Maine, Windsor M

1814 – 7 May, Sydney Gazette: “This is to caution the Public from giving credit to my wife Ann Maine, as I will not become responsible for any debts she may contract; having left her home without any cause or provocation whatever, Parramatta Tollgate, Edward Maine.”

1822 – Convict, wife to A Laine, Liverpool M

1825 – Convict, wife of Ed Main (also listed as Mayne), came free, Nautilus 1798, schoolmaster and landholder, Minto M

1828 – Anne Main, aged 35, AP, Factory, Parramatta; Edward Maine, aged 55, Nautilus 1797, painter, residing at William Carlisle, Bathurst St, Sydney CEN

Ann was issued ToL 1373, CI

Edward Maine, by trade a tailor and a former artilleryman, had originally arrived in NSW as a missionary. Further information about him can be found at Australian Dictionary of Biography

Sources:
Old Bailey 21 February 1810
CS: 6 April 1813, NRS 897 4/1728, p. 356

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 18 July 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 35
Sentence: 7 years

Mary was convicted of stealing a child’s frock, trowsers and shirt off the back of the four-year old son of Isaac and Rose Harris who lived at 3 Baker’s Row, Whitechapel. The child had been missing in the early evening for over an hour when Mary turned up at a clothes shop in Whitechapel Road with his clothing for sale. Mary later claimed she had been drinking at the Red Lion and another woman had given her the clothing and asked her to sell the garments; she was to ask 1 shilling 6p for them. She said the woman had come with her to the door of the shop but did not want to go in herself as she had quarrelled with the shopwoman the week before. The woman in the shop recognised the garments as belonging to the Harris’ child. She and her husband sent Mary to the Harris’ house with the clothes. Rose Harris returned home to find Mary on her doorstep holding her unclad son in her lap “quite stiff with cold”.

1812 – 27 June, Mary Longfield m. Stephen Highland, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns, CS

1813 – 14 February, daughter Sarah baptised CS

1814 – Mary Longford, convict, off stores, wife to Stephen Hyland, Parramatta; 1 child M

1815 – approx. birth of son Thomas M

1819 – Mary Ireland died, aged 38 M

Stephen Hyland is shown in the 1822 muster as a government blacksmith at Liverpool, and working at Parramatta in the 1828 census. Sentenced to life, he arrived on the Tellicherry in 1806 and by 1825 had a conditional pardon. A son Thomas, aged 7, is shown in the 1822 muster, as well as daughter Sarah. Thomas is shown as 13 in the 1828 census (and incorrectly as 16 in 1825), so he was born c. 1815.

Sources:
Old Bailey 18 July 1810
CS Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1812, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Baptism return for quarter ended 31 March 1813, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 21 February 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 37
Sentence: 7 years

Mary was apprehended in the kitchen of a house belonging to John Rice. She claimed to have stumbled in off the street to get sober before she went home, but two lodgers in the house found she had wrenched the brass cock out of a water butt. The fitting, worth 2 shillings, was found upon her. She told the court: “I was very much in liquor, and very much reduced: I went out picking up rags and bones; I picked up that cock among some ashes. I have two fatherless children.”

1814 – Convict, off stores, single, Liverpool M

1814 – 26 December, Mary Reed, aged 41, m. Patrick Hopkins, aged 30, Indian, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns, CS

1820 – Mary Mcdonald, FBS, (with) William Soppins, Windsor M

1825 – Mary Hopkins died 1823 Sydney, FBS, 7 years M

It is not confirmed that Mary Reed and Mary Macdonald are the same person but she is the most likely candidate among the Friends women. In the musters, Mary Reed in 1814 and Mary Hopkins in 1825 were both recorded as of the Friends.

Sources:
Old Bailey 21 February 1810
CS Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1814, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Margaret Waddell

Convicted: High Court of Justiciary, Glasgow , 29 April 1808
Crime: Housebreaking and theft
Age: Unknown
Sentence: 14 years

Margaret was convicted with her husband John Waddell as part of what seems to have been a criminal gang.  They were tried alongside William Sanderson, a travelling merchant and his wife Mary McFarlane, and Mary Kyle, wife of bricklayer George Roder.  John Hodge or Hodgen, a former weaver from Lanark and later a travelling merchant, was tried in absentia. All of the gang present in court pleaded guilty to various acts of housebreaking and theft and were sentenced to transportation. Margaret’s husband John, a smith from Calton, was shown incorrectly on the joint transportation register for the Friends/Admiral Gambier as ‘John Waddell Smith’. However, he did not sail on the male transport Admiral Gambier; instead he voyaged on the Guildford, which sailed on 3 September 1811.

1807 – Margaret McDonald m. John Waddell, Smith, in Glasgow on 6 July 1807

Van Diemen’s Land:

1812 – July, arrived at Port Dalrymple (Launceston, VDL) from Sydney on board the Lady Nelson with John Waddle, remarks: very good

1817 – 14 May, daughter Elizabeth born Launceston

1820 – Wife of John Waddle, Port Dalrymple

1821 – Wife of John Waddle, Port Dalrymple

1830 – 15 July, Fined 2 shillings for keeping two dogs without a licence

Sources:
Marriage – www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk
National Archives of Scotland : High Court case papers, JC 26/337; Minute Book entries, JC 13/36; April 1808
Caledonian Mercury, 14 April 1808; ‘Circuit Intelligence’, 30 April 1808
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)
Assignment lists, CON 13-1-1, p. 29, Tasmanian State Archives
Birth of Elizabeth – www.loiswillis.com

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: High Court of Justiciary, Edinburgh, 22 March 1808
Crime: Theft by housebreaking, habit and repute
Age: unknown
Sentence: 14 years

1822 – Catherine McCoy, FBS, 7 years, infirm old woman, Windsor M

1825 – Catherine McCoy, FBS, labourer, Wilberforce M

Sources:
National Archives of Scotland: High Court Case papers: JC26/338; Minute book entry JC8/5; Book of Adjournal entry JC4/4

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 21 February 1810
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 20
Sentence: Death, later commuted to transportation for life
Native place: London

Sarah was charged with Ann Kolp who also travelled on the Friends. The two young women had shoplifted some 28 yards of printed cotton and 7 yards of other cotton in the shop of John Thwaites linen draper in Upper Holborn. Ann hid the cloth under her petticoats and the draper saw it when it fell to the floor. He apprehended both women and took them to a back room to await a constable. Sarah tried to escape by climbing over a wall in the yard but was stopped by a neighbour. When the police finally arrived to arrest them, Ann hit out at the shop girl as she was escorted out of the shop, then turned and kicked Thwaites “at a certain part, which caused such pain, I was not able to rise for two hours”.

1812 – 28 October, convicted by William Cox, one year sentence CS

1812 – 19 November, on list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle CS

1812 – 4 December, prisoner at Newcastle. Permitted to return to her former service with Rev. Robert Cartwright CS

1812 – 14 December, proceeding to Sydney from Newcastle by governor’s order, per Estramina CS

1814 – Convict, on stores, Factory, Parramatta M

1818 – 5 December, at Female Factory, Parramatta. Petition for mitigation of sentence, requests a ticket of leave CS (Shortly after this, Sarah is issued ToL 476 CI)

1819 – November, prisoner, single, Parramatta, ToL M

1822 – ToL, with G Beck, Sydney M (George Beck was a convict who worked as a pressman in the government printing office. CS)

1824 – 5 October, of Sydney. Affidavit re loss of her ticket of leave issued six years earlier, lost from her person, signed with x . Written at the bottom is 71 Pitt Street and No. 1744. This is probably Sarah’s address and the number of her replacement ToL CS

1825 – 30 June, Sydney Gazette, William Judd had in his possession a silver gilt watch stolen from premises of Arthur Hill, which he sold. ToL revoked and sent to a penal colony for 3 years

1825 – ToL, living with William Judd, Sydney; William Judd, ToL, Earl Spencer 1813, life, dealer Sydney, to Port Macquarie M

1825 – 5 July, petition from Wm Judd to Governor; May had been cohabiting with William Judd for 11 years. Judd writes from HM Goal in Sydney and has been sentenced to 3 years at Port Macquarie. Judd seeks permission to marry May and for her to follow on or accompany him to Port Macquarie. Appears to be written and signed by Judd. Petition supported by Rev. Richard Hill CS

1825 – 6 July, Sarah May and William Judd on Rev. Richard Hill’s list of convicts requesting permission to marry at Sydney CS

1825 – 18 July, Governor refuses permission to William Judd to marry Sarah May CS

1828 – Sarah May m. Israel Leet, Wilberforce NSWBDM

1828 – Sarah Lett, aged 38, ToL, married to Israel, aged 38, FBS, farmer, Shipley 1817, 7 years, Lower Portland Head CEN

1829 – 1 July, Conditional Pardon 40/109 issued; mantua maker, born 1791, 4 feet 7 “, fair pale complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes, native place: London CP

1845 – Sarah Leet dies aged 56 NSWBDM

Israel Leet came from East Bergholt in Suffolk, He died in 1864 aged 75 in Liverpool. His name is listed in the death register as Israel Levy. William Judd died in 1844 aged 52. NSWBDM

Sources:
Old Bailey 21 February 1810
CS: 19 November 1812, NRS 936 4/3492, p. 164; 4 December 1812, NRS 936 4/3492, p. 166; 5 December 1812, NRS 900 4/1855, p. 181; 14 December 1812 NRS 897 4/1804 p. 121; 5 October, 1824, NRS 898 4/1716.1, pp. 235-6; 5 July 1825, NRS 897 4/1817, p. 91; 6 July 1825, NRS 937 4/3514, p. 587; 18 July 1825, NRS 937 4/3515, p. 46; 4 May 1822, NRS 897 4/1752 p. 50 (Beck)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 18 July 1810
Crime: Highway robbery
Age: 20
Sentence: 7 years

It was a case of her word against her prosecutor’s when Mary was tried for taking £3 from his pocket in a courtyard near the Strand. The man, Jonathan Whittaker, called to some other men and they followed Mary to her lodgings. With the reinforcement of a constable they got into the house and found Mary in bed; there were no banknotes on her. She claimed to have been there all evening.

1812 – 30 April, Mary Murphy and Edward Goodwin, free, letter to Rev Robert Cartwright approving list of convicts to marry at Hawkesbury. (Edward “Goodin” instead marries Friends woman Mary Browning in Windsor on 31 August 1812.) CS

1813 – 13 September, Mary Murphy, aged 24, m. John Stretton, aged 34, at St Johns Parramatta, Rev. Samuel Marsden’s marriage returns CS

1814 – Mary Murphy, convict, off stores, wife to J Shelton, Liverpool M

Van Diemen’s Land:

1816 – 23 August, arrived at Port Dalrymple (Launceston, VDL) from Sydney on board the Kangaroo. Now wife of John Stratton.

1818 – According to family history sites, Mary had died by this date. John Stretton has a child with Catherine Corrigan.

1819 – Mary Stratton, off stores, Port Dalrymple M

John Stretton (also spelt Stratton) was an overseer at brickworks at Georgetown, VDL, according to a family history website. He later married Catherine and they had two sons and moved to Victoria about 1840. He arrived on the Ann 2 in 1806, sentenced to life.

Sources:
Old Bailey 18 July 1810
CS: NRS 935 4/3491, p. 238; Marriage return for quarter ended 30 September 1813, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)

Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Susannah Noon

Convicted: Essex Quarter Sessions, Colchester, 30 April 1810
Crime: Fraud
Age: about 12
Sentence: 7 years

Susannah was convicted of the theft of four pairs of stockings from the shop of Thomas Podd, hosier in St Boltophs, Colchester. She had claimed to be the servant of a regular customer, Mrs Walker, and had asked to take away some cotton stockings for her employer’s approval. She returned half an hour later with all of the stockings and informed the shopkeeper’s wife that her mistress wished to take four pairs, at a value of 10 shillings. Podd and his wife were suspicious and called the constable. It was quickly established that Susannah did not work for Mrs Walker. She was charged with fraud and sentenced three days later.

A detailed history of what is known of Susannah Noon’s life features in The Girl Who Stole Stockings, along with a comprehensive outline of the administrative regime and convict culture in NSW from 1810 to 1825. 

1811 – 25 November, Susannah Noon m. William Docwra (aka Dockerell), St Matthews, Windsor NSWBDM: Susannah Noen m. William Doewra (William, 7 years, Fortune 1806, GS, carpenter)

1814 – Convict, wife to W Ducey, off stores, Windsor; William Dockra, on stores, carpenter, government employ M

1817 – Susannah Noon, ToL, housekeeper, residing in the colony M

1820 – Susannah and William move to Sydney. The following year advertisements start appearing in the Sydney Gazette for their shop in George Street.

1824 – 22 January, William Dockerell died, Sydney, aged 56

1825 – Susan Gage, FBS, housekeeper, Sydney M

1825 – 6 July, Susan Dockerell and Samuel Cave on list from Rev. Richard Hill of convicts requesting permission to marry at Sydney. CS

1825 – 15 October, Susannah Dockerell m. Samuel Cave, St James, Sydney (Samuel, Royal Charlotte 1825, bigamy, 7 years)

1827 – 20 November, daughter Ann born, Sydney NSWBDM

1828 – Susanna Cave, aged 30, CoF, Clarence Street; Samuel Cave, GS, aged 35, Carters Barracks, overseer to Government ; Daughter: Ann, born colony CEN

1830 – 30 March, Samuel issued ticket of exemption No. 30/117 (two more tickets issued in 1831) NSWSR

1830 – 20 April, daughter Susannah born, Sydney NSWBDM

1831 – Daughter Eliza born NSWBDM

1831 – 3 September, Samuel – a cooper by trade – leaves on whaling voyage in Australian

1833 – 1 March, Samuel returns to Sydney from whaling voyage

1833 – 23 April, daughter Eliza buried aged 17 months NSWBDM

1834 – 17 May, Samuel issued Certificate of Freedom NSWSR

1835 – 4 February, son Charles Samuel born NSWBDM

1837 – 9 December, Susannah, Samuel and children leave Sydney for New Zealand on the Vanguard.

Susannah and her family lived in Ocean Bay, Port Underwood (Cloudy Bay), while Samuel continued to work in the whaling industry.

1843 – 24 June, Susannah gives deposition to the magistrates investigating the fight at the Wairau between Maori led by Te Rauparaha and Te Rangihaeata, and Nelson colonists led by Captain Arthur Wakefield

1847 – Susannah and her family leave Port Underwood and move to Nelson.

1852 – 30 June, Susannah died aged 52 NZBDM

Sources:
Quarter Sessions, Easter 1810, Essex Record Office, D/B5Sr387
Marriage register, St Matthews, Windsor, 25 November 1811
William Dockerell’s death, Sydney Gazette, 29 January 1824, p. 3
CS: 6 July 1825, NRS 937 4/3514, p. 587
Marriage register, entry no. 44, St James Church, Sydney, 15 October 1825, SAG
Samuel Cave’s Certificates of Exemption, No. 30/117, 30 March 1830, NSWSR 4/4284 1004, 4/4061 1006; No 31/19, 3 January 1831, NSWSR 4/4284 1004, 4/4062 1006
Annual returns of persons who have cleared out of the port of Sydney, 1 January 1831 to 31 December 1831, Mitchell Library. R Bourke’s despatch 1832, A 1210 p. 1105
Australian, ‘Shipping Intelligence,’ Sydney Gazette, 2 March 1833, p. 2
Samuel Cave’s Certificate of Freedom, 17 May 1834, NSWSR Reel 992, No. 34/0599 4/4321
Vanguard’s departure, Sydney Herald, 14 December 1837, p. 2
Susannah’s deposition, 24 June 1843 (filed under) ‘Tua Marina Monument’, Archives New Zealand, Wellington, 1A/1/1870/3598
William Boyce’s obituary, Colonist, 18 March 1895, p. 2
Ann Boyce’s obituary, Colonist, 4 March 1914, p. 4

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Peterborough Quarter Sessions, Northamptonshire, 12 April 1809
Crime: Having in her possession forged bank notes
Age: About 25
Sentence: 14 years

Mary, of Elton, Huntingdonshire, was caught trying to present a forged Bank of England note for £5 to Charles Dodson, of Peterborough, and for having another forged note in her possession. She was committed to trial in March 1809. In court, the bank’s solicitor ‘very humanely’ declined to call any evidence that would have made it a capital (hanging) offence. Mary pleaded guilty.

1813 – 4 July, daughter Elizabeth born, father James Martin, baptised 1 August, Rev. Cowper’s baptism returns, Sydney CS

1814 – Convict, off stores, lives with A Little, Sydney; 1 child M

1816 – Son John born, father Arthur Little NSWBDM

1822 – Wife of A. Little, Sydney ; Arthur Little, ToL, cowkeeper, Sydney; Children: Elizabeth aged 9, John aged 7, Ellen aged 4 and Sarah aged 2 M

1825 – 29 August, Mary Norman m. Archibald Little, St Philips, Sydney NSWBDM

1825 – FBS, 14 yrs, wife of A Little, Sydney M

1828 – Aged 44, wife of Arthur, aged 43, ToL, Providence 2 1811, life, dealer, King Street; Children: Elizabeth aged 15 , John aged 13 , Eleanor aged 11, Sarah aged 9, Archibald aged 6, all born colony CEN

1857 – 8 June, Mary Little of Rockwall, McLeay Street, Woolloomooloo, Sydney, wife of Arthur Little, died aged 73 years

In the NSWBDM record of her death, Mary’s father’s name is given as John and her mother’s maiden name as Whitney.

Arthur Little had been convicted of stealing eight pairs of window sashes in County Armagh, Ireland. In NSW he owned land at Minto and received his conditional pardon on 11 March 1830. On his death, at the age of 75 on 28 March 1862, his property was valued at ₤55 000, though a Brisbane newspaper suggested he had several hundred thousand pounds in the bank. (The Courier, 4 April 1862, p. 4)

Rockwall House, where Mary lived with Arthur, is still standing in Sydney and is on Australia’s Register of the National Estate. It is a two-storey (plus cellar) sandstone villa with five bays and a verandah that encircles the house, standing in Rockwall Crescent. It was one of the earlier homes designed by architect John Verge and was built from 1831 to 1837. Arthur Little bought the house in 1837. Today it is the only surviving Georgian mansion built in the Potts Point district that has a garden and is still in private ownership. In early 2014 it sold for more than A$10 million.

Sources:
The Lincoln, Rutland and Stamford Mercury, 17 March 1809, p. 3; 14 April 1809, p. 3
CS: Baptism register for quarter ended 31 July 1813, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024
Mary’s death: Sydney Morning Herald, 10 June 1857, p. 1
Arthur Little – Providence convict ship
Sydney aldermen
Rockwall house
Rockwall house Wikipedia
Rockwall house sale 2014

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Surrey Assizes, 28 March 1810
Crime: Larceny in a dwelling house
Age: Unknown
Sentence: Death, later commuted to transportation for life

Van Diemen’s Land:

1812 – July, arrived at Port Dalrymple (Launceston, VDL) on board the Lady Nelson. Remarks: very good

No further information has been located about Ann.

Sources:
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)
Assignment lists, CON 13-1-1, p. 29, Tasmanian State Archives

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 31 October 1810
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 32
Sentence: 7 years

Elizabeth was with 21-year old Mary Jones when they went into the shop of Robert Kenyon Hosier at 64 Holborn Hill. When they left the shop, the owner noticed a parcel of 12 pairs of silk stockings was missing that he had left on a chair ready to be delivered to a customer. He went after them and when he caught up with them in the street Mary dropped the parcel on the ground. The stockings had a value of £4 10 shillings. In court Elizabeth said: “I am as innocent of it as a child unborn. I have a dying husband at home”. Both Elizabeth and Mary travelled on the Friends to NSW.

Elizabeth’s age was given as 32 in court but according to prison records in NSW she was born in 1787 and therefore was about 23 when convicted. This seems more likely as she had her last child in 1822.

1812 – 27 July Elizabeth August m. Thomas Ireland, St Philips, Sydney, Rev. Cowper’s marriage returns CS

1813 – 20 December, son Martin born, baptised 6 February 1814, St Philips, Sydney, Rev. Cowper’s baptism returns CS

1814 – Convict, off stores, off stores, wife to T Ireland, Sydney; Thomas Ireland, convict, on stores, Duke of Portland, servant to James Cowgill; 1 child M

1822 – FBS, wife of T Ireland, CP, Duke of Portland, life, householder, Sydney; Children: Martin aged 9, Joseph aged 5, Elizabeth aged 3 months M

1825 – Wife of Thomas Ireland, Sydney

1828 – aged 40, “Francis” 1811; wife of Thomas Ireland, aged 42, Pro, shoemaker at Mary Starkey’s, Kent Street; Children: Elizabeth, 5, and Hannah, 3 CEN

1837 – Arrested for receiving stolen goods; Elizabeth Hyland, Friends, born 1787, 5 feet 1” tall, slender, fresh complexion, black hair, gray eyes GD

1837 – 29 April, admitted for trial; Free, protestant, native place: London, servant GD

1837 – 27 October, transferred to Moreton Bay on Isabelle, GD

1837 – Died aged 50, Moreton Bay burial returns

NOTE: Ireland was also spelt Hyland. Elizabeth’s son Martin used the surname Hyland.

Known in her neighbourhood by the name of “Flowerpot Bet”, in 1837 Elizabeth was arrested for receiving stolen goods. A black convict working as a servant had stolen a watch and a little over £14 from his master. He was found within the hour in Payne’s house with some of the money and she and another woman present had £1 10s in their possession. The women told the police that the servant, who went by the name of Adonis, had given them the money. The missing watch, worth £50, was hanging on a nail on the wall of Payne’s house. She died shortly after her arrival at Moreton Bay and before the end of 1837, according to burial returns. However, one family history entry on www.ancestry.com gives her date of death as 11 September 1838 (as well as a birthplace of Hampshire, which is at odds with the GD records). Her death (as Elizabeth Hyland) is also shown in the NSWBDM as 1838 but this may be when it was registered.

The Eagle Farm Women’s Prison and Factory, a Queensland heritage-registered site since 1990, was opened in 1829 in an attempt to separate male and female prisoners and, by 1836, was home to 40 female convicts. Despite additional fortifications, rendezvous between prisoners still occurred and by July 1839 the prison was closed. Eagle Farm was 6 kms from Brisbane’s current CBD.

Elizabeth’s trial and conviction at the Old Bailey feature in “The Newgate Calendar” edited by Donal O Danachair, Vol. 5, published by the Ex-Classics Project, 2009.

Sources:
Old Bailey 31 October 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 July 1812, St Philps, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Baptism return for quarter ended 31 March 1814, St Philps, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024
Arrest and trial: Sydney Herald, 1 May 1837
Half yearly return of burials at the settlement of Moreton Bay (Brisbane) from 1 July to 31 Dec 1837
Elizabeth Hyland – convict Friends Reel A2.12 page 26, Queensland State Library
Eagle Farm – wikipedia.com

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Elizabeth Pendergrass

Convicted: Middlesex, Old Bailey, London, 19 September 1810
Crime: Theft from a specified place
Age: 15
Sentence: 7 years

Bridget was tried as Pendergast at the Old Bailey. Her name was spelt Pendegrass in the Criminal Register and her age recorded as 16.

Bridget was a house servant who worked for Nancy Cutts. Her husband Charles Cutts kept the Cooper’s Arms public house. Bridget had left her service on 8 August and that evening, Nancy Cutts noticed several garments and some muslin missing. She found Bridget the next evening at the Flying Horse in Lambeth Street wearing her missing gown and spencer. Bridget had sold some of the muslin and a black lace cloak for £2 to a local milliner who also later testified against her in court. The remaining items, another gown, bonnet, shawl, muslin and ann old nightcap were found by an officer in a box and trunk in her room in Thames Street.

Her father had been convicted at the Old Bailey in January 1807 (as Patrick Prendergast) for burglary. With some other men, he was accused of robbing the house of George Bell in Brent Bridge, Hendon. His 17-year old daughter Catherine, also known as Kitty, worked for Bell as housekeeper and Patrick had a pint of beer and cold victuals at the house every day. He worked nearby for farmer Isaac Franklin and often slept in his loft. Patrick also had two or more sons. Catherine was also tried with her father for the burglary but was not put on her defence and was found not guilty. Patrick was sentenced to death and later executed. In the record of Bridget’s conviction in the Criminal Register, it refers to her father’s execution and it states she had been in Newgate before. There is no record of any previous charge, and this may have been a mistake, referring to her sister Catherine’s imprisonment a few years earlier while awaiting her trial.

1813 – 20 April, Elizabeth Pendergrass m Edward Fuller, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS

1814 – Elizabeth Prendergrass, off stores, wife to Edward Fuller, Parramatta, 1 child M

1822 – Elizabeth Pendergrass, FBS, wife of Edward Fuller, CP, Fortune, life, butcher, Parramatta; 4 children aged 2 to 9 M

1825 – Elizabeth Pendergrass, FBS wife of Edward Fuller, Parramatta M

1828 – Elizabeth Fuller aged 33, FBS; Edward aged 38 GS, Friendship 1804, life, landholder, CastleHill, Pro; Children: Edward 15, Sarah 14, Robert 12 CEN (The ship shown for Edward in the census was incorrect)

1855 – 25 September, died aged 60 NSWBDM

Much of the following information is from family history sites:
Bridget was always known as Elizabeth in NSW. She was married by Rev Samuel Marsden five months before the birth of her first child. Her Friends shipmate Mary Jones was one of the witnesses at the wedding. Elizabeth lived with her husband at Dural, near where Oakhill Cottage stands today.

Her children were Edward, born 1813, Saran Ann Emma born 1815, Robert born 1817, Lydia Anna born 1820, Eliza born 1829, John b 1830, Mary born 1832, and Timonthy born 1835.

In 1824 Edward Fuller applied for a second land grant and, in his application, he stated that his wife “has been badly burnt by her clothes taking fire That she had been lying dangerously ill for these two months past”. A supporting reference from Rev. Marsden stated that his wife “had distressed him very much by her misconduct. I am of the opinion he would be able to provide for the family if he had a small farm and was to go out and reside upon it, where his wife would be removed from her present temptation”.

Elizabeth together with two other women appeared before the Bench magistrate in Parramatta on 3 July 1824 charged with drunkenness. They were discharged.

The Sydney Gazette, 17 March 1825, reported that Elizabeth Fuller had been charged with stealing crockery from Mr J. Chandler and reported a week later that she had been discharged from custody. In March 1826, Edward cautioned the public against giving credit to his wife Elizabeth.

Elizabeth’s main problem in the colony was alcohol. Eight months after her husband’s death, Elizabeth drank too much and cut her own throat. At an inquest into her death the jury determined that she was suffering from the temporary insanity of delirium tremens.

Sources:
Old Bailey 19 September 1810
Patrick Prendergast stet (father) Old Bailey 14 January 1807
CS: Marriage return for 30 June 1813, St Johns Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024; 18 August 1824 NRS 899 4/1837A 362, p. 403
Sydney Gazette, 17 March 1825; 24 March 1825; 29 March 1826
Sydney Morning Herald, 1 March 1848; 30 October 1855 (inquest)
Family history site (1)
Family history site (2)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 18 July 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 41
Sentence: 7 years

Ann was convicted of taking 2 ½ ounces of hair wool from the premises of hatter and furrier William Halliwell at 106 Bunhill Row. An employee saw her take it from a board, put it in a rag and put it in her pocket. It is not clear if Ann worked for the hatter and furrier or not. She called one witness in her defence who gave her a good character.

1814 – Ann Rickerby, convict, off stores, single, Sydney M

1822 – Ann Rickerby, FBS, laundress, Lane Cove M

1825 – FBS, wife of James Stimson, Sydney M

1828 – Ann Ricaby , aged 59, FBS, lodger at James Stimsons, Sussex St, Sydney; James Stimson, aged 58, CP, Glatton 1803 , life, labourer Sussex St CEN

1846 – Ann Ricaby died aged 81 NSWBDM

No record of a marriage to James Stimson has been found.

Source:
Old Bailey 18 July 1810

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 6 June 1810
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 18
Sentence: 7 years

Margaret was tried as Margeret Robertson at the Old Bailey. Her age was recorded at 19 in the Criminal Register.

Margaret was with two other people when they took 24 yards of printed cotton from the shop counter of James Laming, linen draper of Ludgate Hill. They were seen by a constable going into the shop and he knew Margaret to be a suspicious character so he set another man to keep watch while he went for assistance. Margaret and the others came out of the shop separately and one woman was later seen passing the cloth to Margaret. She was stopped on the street outside a pawnbroker’s and had the cloth in her apron. It was worth £1.

1814 – 25 February , Permission granted to Mary Robinson to marry Bryan Kearns at Windsor CS

1814 – Bryan Kearns, Friendship 1814, convict, off stores, ToL, landholder, Sydney M

1819 – (With) B Kearns M

1825 – FBS, employed by Capt Piper, Sydney; Bryan Kearns, Friendship 1799, FBS, landholder, middle harbour, Sydney M

1828 – Aged 36, FBS, no employment given, residence: Brian Carnes, Hunter Hill CEN

Note: The Hawkesbury marriage return for the 3rd quarter of 1814 is missing from the CS records and a marriage cannot be located in NSWBDM, so it is not clear if Margaret married Bryan Kearns.

Sources:
Old Bailey 6 June 1810
CS: 25 February 1814, NRS 937 4/3493, p. 64

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Lancaster Quarter Sessions, 11 January 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 24
Sentence: seven years
Native place:  Preston

1813 – 21 July, Mary Rubey on list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle (penal settlement) per Estramina; sentenced by the governor on 14 July to 1 year CS

1815 – 15 May, Mary Ruby sent to Sydney from Newcastle CS

1821 – Mary Ruby died aged 35 NSWBDM

Mary was on convict lists as Roby, Rubey and Ruby.

A woman of the same name was convicted of larceny in January 1809 and sentenced to four months in the House of Correction at Preston, to be served in solitary confinement and at hard labour.  If she was the same person, reoffending earned her a sentence of transportation in 1810. Mary’s accuser was Peter Dewhurst in 1810 and though of Preston she was tried in Lancaster and held in Lancaster Castle. She was described as a single woman.

Sources:
Lancashire Archives: Mary Roby, Bill of Costs of Prosecution: QSP/2589/32
Lancashire Quarter Sessions records, 1810, www.ancestry.com CS: 21 July 1813, NRS 936 4/3292, p. 239; 15 May 1815, NRS 897 4/1805, p. 185

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Liverpool Quarter Sessions, Lancashire, 17 July 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 28
Sentence: 7 years

Elizabeth was convicted at the same sessions as Sarah Smith who also travelled on the Friends.

1811 – 25 December, Elizabeth Roscoe m. Owen Connor, St Philips, Sydney, Rev. Cowper’s marriage returns CS

1814 – Free, off stores,wife to O Connor, Liverpool; Owen Connor, free, off stores, Marquis Cornwallis, landholder M

1814 – Elizabeth Connor died, aged 32 NSWBDM

A death is shown in the Liverpool burial returns for Elizabeth Munay, Friends, aged 33, buried 6 December 1814.  It is highly probable this was Elizabeth Roscoe. CS

Sources:
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1811, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Burial return for quarter ended 31 December 1814, Liverpool, NRS 898, Reel 6025

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Surrey Assizes, 28 March 1810
Crime: Larceny in a dwelling house
Age: 17
Sentence: Death and later commuted to transportation for life

Martha stole money £28 in money (coin) and banknotes to the value of £25 from the house of William Wilkinson.

Martha may have been assigned in Sydney to the family of Lieutenant Andrew Geils. Lt Geils, of the 73rd Regiment,  was sent to Van Diemen’s Land in 1812 as commandant of the Hobart settlement (in a brief caretaker role until the appointment of the new Lt. Governor in early 1813).

Van Diemen’s Land

1812 – 12 February, Martha arrives at the Derwent, VDL, on Ruby with Geils family and other convict servants, including John Huxley (Admiral Gambier)

1813 – 19 January, Martha Rowe m. John Huxley on banks of the Derwent River, Rev. Robert Knopwood

1813 – John and Martha both assigned to Geils at Risdon CS

1813 – March, first child Richard baptised by Rev. Knopwood

1814 – son Richard died, aged 11 months

1815 – May, son John born

1817 – son William born, baptised by Rev Knopwood in rooms at Government House (church not yet built)

1819 – October, 4th son (also named) Richard baptised

1820 – Martha Hudley, constable’s wife, Hobart Town

1821 – 7 August, Conditional Pardon issued, No. 1424, recommended on account of her “steady conduct” CI and CP

1823 – April, son George baptised 

1823 – June, John Huxley granted 80 acres of land in district of Bath (now Colebrook)

1823 – John Huxley killed near Jerusalem (now Colebrook)

1823 – 22 October, Martha m. Richard Luck. (Richard Luck was a convict who arrived on the Richmond in 1822.)

1825 – Martha and Richard Luck attend Supreme Court of Tasmania  hearing into administration of estate and effects of John Huxley

1838 – 5 May, Richard Luck, blacksmith at Kangaroo Point, applies for bankruptcy

1838 – 20 December, free (absolute) pardon recommended, approved 20 November 1840

1842 – Richard Luck died at Kangaroo Point

1851 – 15 December, Martha, aged 65 years, widow and housekeeper, m. John Spauling, aged 53, farmer and widower, Clarence, Tasmania

1861 – John Spauling died at Ralphs Bay

1870 – 27 April, Martha Roe died at the Cascades Paupers Establishment, Hobart; cause of death: “dropsy of the extremities”

Much of the information above and below comes from a family history site:

Martha was born on 29 May 1792 to William and Jane Rowe of Kingston, Cambridgeshire. Martha had five children to John Huxley: Richard, born 1813 and died 1814, John born 1815, William born 1817, Richard born 1819 and George born 1821.

John Huxley had been convicted in September 1810 at the Chester Assizes of breaking into a dwelling house and stealing £29. He was sentenced to transportation for life. He received a Conditional Pardon in 1816 and he was also appointed a constable that year. Huxley later farmed at Kangaroo Point and was reported killed by aborigines sometime in 1823. His body was not recovered until two years after he went missing. After John’s disappearance, Martha married Luck, recorded in the records as a farmer and smith, no doubt to have someone help her to run the property at Kangaroo Point. Martha had three living sons when she died.

Sources:
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)
CS List of persons victualled 21 May 1813, NRS 897, Reel 6044 4/1729 p. 260
Convict record Tasmanian State Archives
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 6 June 1810
Crime: shoplifting
Age: 38
Sentence: Death, later commuted to transportation for life

Tried at Old Bailey as Ann Riley

Ann went into the shop of Thomas Blowers, linen draper in Tottenham Court Road, and purchased half a yard of Irish cotton for 11p. She was dressed in a gown and shawl but had no cloak. After she had left the shop, the shop man noticed nine yards of printed cotton was missing. He ran after her down the street and when he confronted her, Ann produced the missing cotton from where she was concealing it under her apron or gown. Ann spoke in some detail to the court, concluding with the remark that she was a hardworking woman. Ann was recommended to His Majesty’s mercy by the jury on account of her being pregnant. The entry of her trial in the Criminal Register noted she had “been before convicted”.

Ann’s child, likely named Thomas, would have been born before the departure of the Friends. See Thomas Gwilliam

1813 – Ann Riley m William Gullin, St Philips, Sydney NSWBDM

1814 – Ann Riley, convict, off stores, Sydney, wife to W. Gwillim; William Gwillin, convict, on stores, Duke of Portland, Smith lumberyard; one child on stores, one off stores M

1819 – Ann Riley free, William Gillham M

1821 – 1 March, Anne Reilly died, Catholic returns by Rev. John Joseph Therry CS

The marriage returns for the second quarter of 1813 for St Philips are missing in the CS files. The death date provided is not confirmed. There was another Ann Riley who died aged 27 in 1818. NSWBDM

Sources:
Old Bailey 6 June 1810
CS: Burial return for quarter ended 31 March 1821, NRS 898 2/8302, pp. 57-72

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 19 September 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 29
Sentence: 7 Years
Transportation Register: shown as wife of William Sanders

Mary Sanders was convicted of stealing a shift and a frock from the house of Mary Gibeaud, a laundress who lived at 3 Bury Street. The garments had been hanging on the staircase. Mary had taken them to a pawnbroker in Little Pulteney (sic) Street. When Mary was arrested at 6 Little Russell Street, Bloomsbury, she had 31 duplicates (pawn tickets) on her.

1814 – Convict, off stores, single, Sydney M

1819 – (with) J. Brown; 1 child, off stores M

1821 – 19 March, to be kept in goal till security to be given GD

1822 – Mary Saunders FBS wife of J Brown, Sydney M

1825 – wife of J Brown; James Brown, mariner, Sydney; Daughter: Elizabeth, aged 6, born colony, daughter of James Brown, Sydney M

1828 – Aged 51, FBS, laundress, Kent Street, married to James Brown, aged 52, came free, mariner with Wm Beasleys. (James came on the Experiment in 1804) CEN

No record for her marriage to James Brown has been found.

Source:
Old Bailey 19 September 1810

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London 5 December 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 20
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: Hampshire

Mary Shadwell was tried for theft with her stepmother Mary. Mary had taken £312 in promissory notes from the pocket of a Welsh drover she had met on the road just south of London. They had gone to a public house together and had a few drinks and when the drover fell asleep, Mary took her chance and stole the notes. She was caught when her stepmother, an apple seller, tried to cash them a few days later in Westminster. Her stepmother escaped conviction. (Note: the term “mother in law” was used in the court case, which was a synonym at that time for stepmother.)

Mary’s  father’s name was Richard.

Van Diemen’s Land:

1812 – July, arrived at Port Dalrymple (Launceston, VDL) from Sydney on board the Lady Nelson. Remarks: infamous

1819 – 21 – At Port Dalrymple, free M

1836 – 13 April, arrested for stealing 2 domestic fowls, worth 2 shillings 6p, committed to trial.

1836 – 8 July, convicted at Launceston Quarter Sessions and sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment at hard labour

1841 – FBS, Tasmania M

Mary was issued Conditional Pardon no. 311 and Absolute Pardon No. 311 TR

The Colonial Tasmania Family Links site includes a woman named Mary Shadwell who had sons in 1832 and 1846 and who married in 1836. This is unlikely to be the same Mary Shadwell, given her age.

Sources:
Old Bailey 5 December 1810
Convict record Tasmanian State Archives
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 31 October 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: About 22
Sentence: 7 years
Transportation register: shown as wife of John Shearman
Native Place: Chatham, Kent

Mary had worked as a domestic servant for Thomas Bowerbank, at 50 Lothbury, for three or four months. She was found with duplicates (pawn tickets) on her for two silver tablespoon and a silver teaspoon worth 20 shillings. The pawnbroker had advanced half a guinea to her for the tablespoons. A constable had found the duplicates while investigating another matter.

On the same day that she was convicted, Mary was also tried with her sister Sarah Fussell for the theft of some woollen cloth that had been taken from the Bowerbank house. He was a woollen cloth manufacturer at Blackwell Hall. Sarah had claimed that Mary had given her the cloth but Mary later denied any knowledge of it. Mary was found not guilty of this crime, but her sister was convicted and both of them travelled to NSW on the Friends.

Sarah was working as a servant to Rebecca Mathews at the time of her theft and Mary had worked there before her. Mathews told the court they had both conducted themselves honestly in her employ.

1809 – Mary Fussell married John Sherman 1 Jan 1809, St Sepulchre, Holborn (he signed his name, Mary signed the register with a cross)

1814 – Mary Sherman, convict, off stores, single, Parramatta M

1818 – Mary Sharman m. William Clark, St Johns, Parramatta NSWBDM

1822 – Wife of Wm Clark, Parramatta M

1825 – Mary Sheadman, FBS, wife of Wm Clark, Parramatta M

1828 – Aged 40, FBS, wife to William Clark, aged 51, AP, Baring, 1815, labourer, Parramatta; Childen: Charles aged 7, Mary aged 5, Susannah aged 3 CEN

Sources:
Marriage: www.ancestry.com
Old Bailey 31 October 1810

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Sessions of the Peace, 8 December 1809
Crime: Fraud
Age: 35
Sentence: 7 years

Ann was arrested in July 1809 for defrauding Mr Gent, a china-man, in Piccadilly, London, of goods to the value of £36, as well as defrauding Mr Osborne, of Tottenham Court Road, of cabinet furniture worth £10. Ann worked as part of a gang said to be run by a Mr Hamerton, who presented himself as an Irish merchant.  Goods were taken to houses he kept in Russell Square where the unsuspecting tradespeople were told they would be sold at auction, when in fact they were being stolen.

1804 – Approximate birth year of daughter Elizabeth Shorter

1812 – 23 October, former servant to Ellis Bent (deputy judge advocate in Sydney). To be returned from Newcastle (penal settlement) to Sydney, “having promised to return to her former service and to behave better in future”. CS (Ann worked as housemaid to Bent. Fellow shipmate Sarah Smith was also assigned to the family.)

1812 – 12 November, prisoner at Newcastle; sent to Sydney her sentence having expired. CS

1813 – 1 March, Ann Shorter m. Edward Robinson, free, St Matthews, Windsor Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns, CS

1814 – Ann Shorter, convict, off stores, wife to E Robinson, Windsor; 1 child M

1820 – 6 June, Edward Robinson died at halfway house, Parramatta

1822 – FBS, (residing at) William Laurence’s, Windsor M

1825 – FBS, wife of William Lawrence, Windsor M

1828 – William Lawrence, aged 36, CP, Guildford, life, protestant, shopkeeper Windsor CEN

1835 – 25 August, Ann died, buried St Matthews, Windsor

Ann’s daughter Elizabeth did not accompany her on the Friends.  Instead, Elizabeth sailed from England as an adult on the Lord Sidmouth to join her mother, arriving in Sydney on 27 February 1823. The fact that the new arrival was Ann’s daughter was significant enough to warrant a mention in the Sydney Gazette one month later on 27 March.  Elizabeth married the following year.  Her age was given as 20 when she married 26-year old William Barker, also free, at St Philips in Sydney on 13 September 1824. CS  William was a shoemaker and the couple lived in Pitt Street.  In the 1825 muster Elizabeth’s surname was recorded as Parrott, which may have been the surname of her father or the maiden name of Ann, her mother. (Note:  Though Elizabeth did not travel on the Friends, she is mentioned here because of the rarity of a convict child travelling to NSW to join a convict or former convict mother.)

Information from family history website:
Edward Robinson came to NSW on the Admiral Barrington in 1791. He had been convicted of theft at the York Assizes in July 1789. He was pardoned in 1794. He had seven children with Mary Harrison, the last was born in 1805 and this was likely the child shown in the 1814 muster with Ann. She and Edward had no children. Edward was a successful farmer in the Hawkesbury district and had a number of land grants.

No record of a marriage has been located for Ann and William Lawrence.

Ann cannot be identified in the 1828 Census.

Sources:
“Swindling”, The Morning Post, London, 12 July 1809
Paula Jane Byrne (Ed.), Judge Advocate Ellis Bent Letters and Diaries 1809-1811, Desert Pea Press, Sydney, 2012, p. 178
CS: Prisoner: 23 October 1812, NRS 936 4/3492 p. 161; 12 November 1812, NRS 897 4/1804, p. 119; Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1813, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898, Reel 6024; (Elizabeth) Marriage return for quarter ended 30 September 1824, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reels 6020-6040,6070
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

May also have been known as Elizabeth Treble or Tribble

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 11 April 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 33
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: Somersetshire

Elizabeth intercepted a child, Ann Smith, the daughter of a breeches maker, who carrying a bundle of clothes to the laundry in Castle Street and she took her into Portabella (sic) Passage. There, Elizabeth told the child she would hold her bundle if she would undertake a small errand for her. When the child returned, the bundle of clothes, which included her cousin’s gown, shift and apron, was gone and so was Elizabeth. Elizabeth was arrested later wearing the gown. The officer told her he would retrieve her own gown if she told him where it was. She directed him to a chandler’s shop when he found the gown wrapped up. Elizabeth told the court she was from Somersetshire and had “not been five weeks in London”. She was convicted of stealing a gown worth 5 shillings.

She travelled on the Friends with her daughter Ann, who was about four years old and who later used the surname Treble. See Ann Treble

1814 – Convict, off stores, single, Parramatta M

1815 – 4 February, Elizabeth Smith, free, aged 30, m. Joseph Eyles, free, aged 45, St Philips, Sydney, Rev. Cowper’s marriage returns. CS

1822 – Wife of J Eyles Parramatta M

1825 – Wife of Jno Eyles, Parramatta M

1828 – Aged 44, FBS; Joseph aged 55 FBS, Canada 1801, district constable, Field of Mars; Children: Joseph aged 16, John aged 14, William aged 10, James aged 8, Elizabeth aged 4. Mary A aged 12 (servant to Edward Ewer Parramatta) CEN

1854 – 17 September, Elizabeth died aged 70, Field of Mars, Greater Sydney

Sources:
Old Bailey 11 April 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1815, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 11 April 1810
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 32
Sentence: 7 years

Mary had gone into the shop of John Davis, linen draper at 156 Ratcliffe Highway, with another woman, 26-year old Mary Brown. After they left, a man who had a shop across the road saw Mary Brown drop some cloth from under her cloak. He sent his boy across to let Davis know, who in turn sent his servant to follow the women. He caught up with them in Denmark Street, about fifty yards away, both holding some print in their hands. Mary Smith was helping Mary Brown to conceal it again under her gown. They were convicted of stealing 24 yards of printed cotton with a value of 30 shillings. Mary claimed in court she had been intoxicated but the arresting officer said both women appeared quite sober. Both women were sentenced to transportation but Mary Brown travelled on another ship.

1812 – 16 November Mary Smith m. William Hyland, St Philips, Sydney, Rev. William Cowper’s marriage returns CS

1814 – Convict, off stores, wife to W Hyland, convict, off stores, ToL, labourer, Sydney M

1819 – Widow M

1822 – FBS , wife of John Lang, Sydney ; John Lang, convict, Elizabeth, 7 years, labourer, Carters Barracks M

1825 – Mary Smith died Sydney 1824 M

Sources:
Old Bailey 11 April 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1812, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898,Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Liverpool Quarter Sessions, Lancashire, 17 July 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 26
Sentence: 7 years
Transportation register: Listed as wife of James Smith

Sarah was convicted at the same sessions as Elizabeth Roscoe, who also travelled on the Friends.  On arrival in NSW, Sarah was assigned as a nursery maid to the children of Ellis Bent, deputy judge advocate. Fellow Friends shipmate Ann Shorter was also assigned to Ellis Bent.

1814 – Convict, off stores, lives with A Hewitt; Alexander Hewitt, convict, off stores, Glatton, tinman, Sydney; 1 child M

1822 – Wife of J Bucklan (sic); John Buckland, ToL, Guildford, life, tinman, Sydney M

1825 – FBS, wife of J Brickland, Sydney M

1828 – Aged 44, housekeeper to Hy Bucklan, aged 70, ToL, Guildford 1812, life, tinman, Gloucester St, Sydney CEN

The man Sarah lived with was shown as Henry Buckland on the transportation register for the Guildford, convicted in Northampton on 26 July 1808.

Source:
Paula Jane Byrne (Ed.), Judge Advocate Ellis Bent Letters and Diaries 1809-1811, Desert Pea Press, Sydney, 2012, p. 178

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Devon Assizes, 19 March 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: About 28 or 36
Sentence: 7 years
Native place: Cork, Ireland

Sarah was convicted of stealing £8 in notes, four guineas and small change.

1814 – Convict, on stores, hospital nurse, Sydney M

1819 – Single M

1822 – FBS, lodges at Wm Longs, Sydney M

1822 – 24 April, convicted of assault, to find bail, to police on bail 26th July GD

1824 – 14 January, Sarah St Leger, free. Offence: drunk and disorderly, a rogue and vagabond and repeatedly brought before the police on similar charges and sent to the Factory thereon. Punishment: to the Factory as the House of Correction for three calendar months. GD

1825 – Housekeeper Sydney M

1828 – FBS aged 46, labourer, Catholic, at Wm Sheehan, Brickfields CEN

1839 – 26 July, convicted of drunkedness and sentenced to solitary confinement for 24 hours; discharged 30 July , native place: Cork, Protestant GD

1847 – Sarah St Leger died, aged 73 NSWBDM

ToL No. 1010 CI

Sources:
Devon Record Office: Quarter Sessions Gaol Calendars Easter, Midsummer and Michelmas Session QS/32/85,87,90
Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post, 15 March, 29 March 1810

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Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: London Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, 31 October 1810
Crime: Pocketpicking
Age: About 25
Sentence: 7 years

Hannah was working as a prostitute when she picked up Thomas Niven, a general merchant from Deptford, in Leadenhall Street. It was late in the evening and Niven was worse for drink. She took him to Mary Hill’s house in Still Alley, Houndsditch. Niven complained she smelled of onions and asked her to order something to cover the smell; she chose brandy. They also sent out for oysters and porter and Hannah requested £1 for the night. Niven had shown the landlady, Mary Hill, that he had several large banknotes on him when he arrived, presumably to ensure they would remain secure. Hannah, though, made an excuse to leave the room they were given and when she didn’t return Niven realised he had been robbed of £200. Hannah was arrested a few days later in Mile End Road with a £100 note hidden in her clothing, alongwith 2 £1 notes. Mary Hill told the court she had known Hannah for seven years “in the same life as described”.

1814 – Convict, off stores, lives with Luke Fowler, Sydney M

1819 – Single M

1822 – FBS, with George Davis, ToL, Earl Spencer, life, labourer Sydney M (While Hannah either lived in his household or was employed by him, George was married to Jane White.)

1823 – 30 May, Hannah Taylor died aged 35 NSW BDM

1825 – died Sydney, 30 May 1823 M

There is a possibility that Luke Fowler was a sailor from the Friends. See Luke Fowler

Source:
Old Bailey 31 October 1810

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Mary Milbourne, Mary Partridge, Mary Ambridge/Mary Hambridge

Convicted: Liberty of St Albans Quarter Sessions, Hertfordshire, 3 May 1810
Crime: Receiving stolen goods
Age: Between 23 and 31
Sentence: 14 years
Native place: Buckinghamshire

Mary was convicted with Mary Wilmot, both of Elstree, of stealing a wooden box from the Friendly Society containing two club books and £12 in notes, belonging to John Drinkwater, William Howell, and James and Robert Pepler from the Plough Inn, Elstree. Both women were sentenced to transportation and travelled on the Friends.

It looks like Mary travelled on the Friends with her daughter Sarah, aged about two years old. See Sarah Hambridge

1802 – 29 October, Mary Milbourne m. John Taylor in Aldenham, Herts,

1812 – 9 May, Mary Taylor m. Thomas Partridge, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS

1814 – Wife to T. Partridge, off stores, Windsor; Thomas Partridge, Glatton, ToL, off stores; 2 children M

1815 – Thomas Partridge died, aged 48

1818 – 13 October, Mary Partridge, aged 31, ToL, m. George Ambridge, aged 35, free, Fortune (1), Liverpool quarterly marriage returns CS

1822 – Mary Partridge, convict, wife of J Hambridge, Liverpool; Children aged 6, 3 and 1 M

1824 – Mary Hambridge, wife of George Hambridge, Fortune, CP, Bringelley, district constable, Cooke; Children: Sarah, came free, born 1809, Elizabeth born 1814, Mary born 1816, Ann born 1818, George born 1824

1825 – Mary Hambridge, FBS, wife of G Hambridge of Sydney; Children: Sarah aged 16, Elizabeth aged 11, Mary aged 9, Ann aged 4, John aged 3, George aged 6, all born colony M

1825 – 7 April, Certificate of Freedom 18/3501 issued; Age 41, servant, 4 feet 8 ½ “ tall, sallow complexion, dark hair, hazel eyes, native place: Buckinghamshire CF

1828 – Mary Ambridge, aged 42, FBS; George Ambridge aged 44, settlers, Coventry, Cooke district, 200 acres; Children: Eliz aged 16, Ann aged 10, Geo aged 7, John aged 4, Joseph aged 1 CEN

1850 – 2 January, died aged 71, at Rossmore. She was buried on 4 January at St Paul’s Cobbity.

Inconsistent ages are listed throughout the records. Mary was born sometime between 1779 and 1787.

Sources:
Ken Griffen, Transported beyond the Seas, Hertfordshire Family History Society
www.rootschat.com
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1812, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Marriage return for quarter ended 31 December 1818, Liverpool, NRS 898, Reel 1825
Family history site (1)
Family history site (2)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Newcastle Upon Tyne Quarter Sessions, 2 May 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 21
Sentence: 7 years

Elizabeth was convicted at the same sessions as Ann Wardle, who also travelled on the Friends.

1813 – Daughter Elizabeth born (no father named) NSWBDM

1814 – Convict, off stores, lives with A Campbell, Sydney; Alexander Campbell, convict, off stores, Admiral Gambier 2, boatman; 2 children off stores M

1819 – (with) Alex Campbell; 2 children M

1820 – Elizabeth Thompson m. Alexander Campbell, St Philips, Sydney NSWBDM

1825 – FBS, wife of Alexander Campbell, Sydney M

1827 – Elizabeth Campbell died, aged 38 NSWBDM

1828 – Alexander Campbell, aged 39, FBS, life, seven years to the contractor, constable, Cumberland St, Sydney; Children: Elizabeth 16, Ann aged 11, Angus aged 9, Alice aged 7, Flora aged 3 CEN

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also later known as Bridget Smith

Convicted at Kent Assizes, Maidstone, 19 March 1810
Crime: Stealing privately in a shop
Age: About 14
Sentence: Death later commuted to transportation for life.

1814 – Convict, on stores, Factory, Parramatta M

1815 – Bridget Whenner, aged 21, married Thomas Smith, Indian, 23 or 28 Aug 1815, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns CS

1816 – 31 August, Venner, on list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle per Lady Nelson CS

1822 – Bridget Smith, on return of proceedings of the Bench of Magistrates, Parramatta. Charged with drunken riotous conduct in the town, prisoner, off stores CS

1822 – 12 January, to be sent to the Factory until further orders. CS

1822 – 10 May, Sydney Gazette, Bridget Smith and Catherine Farley convicted for stealing two glasses, from a public house (In GD as Catherine Early), also NSWSR

1822 – 12 Apr to 9 May , Bridget Smith, to be transported for 12 months. In reports of prisoners tried at Court of Criminal Jurisdiction. CS

1822 – 15 May on lists of prisoners transported to Port Macquarie per Lady Nelson, listed as Smith or Vernon CS

1822 – Bridget Smith, Port Macquarie M

1823 – 13 May, convict, lately arrived from Port Macquarie being held in Sydney Gaol. To be forwarded to the Factory, Parramatta, listed as Smith or Vernor CS

1825 – Biddy Verner, FBS , 14 yrs, housekeeper, Sydney ; Thomas Smith, government employ, Bathurst M

1837 – Bridget Verner, 41, ToL, Friendship, 1811, Penrith; Thomas Smith, ToL, Penrith M

Tol 29/684 issued, no date given. CI

It is not clear from the records if Biddy remained with Thomas Smith but they were both in Penrith in 1837. Smith was from Horsham, born 1795, and was serving a life sentence. He also got into trouble in the colony. In early 1823 he was discharged from the Emu Plains Agricultural Establishment and sent to Wellington Valley, and in 1824 he was in Bathurst. On 7 December 1826 he was sent to the chain gang for six months for stealing fowls. GD. In the 1828 Census he was a labourer at Rooty Hill Agricultural Establishment. He was finally issued a ticket of leave in 1837 and a conditional pardon in 1840. CP

Sources:
CS: 12 January 1822, NRS 898 X643 p. 1b; 29 April to 9 May 1822, NRS 898 X820 p. 49; 13 May 1822, NRS 937 4/3508, p. 294; 15 May 1822, NRS 937 4/3505, p. 277; 15 May 1822, NRS 939 4/3864, pp. 356-7; 22 January 1823 NRS 898 2/8283 p. 133 (Thomas Smith); 23 May 1823, NRS 898, Reel 6010; 4/3508 p.294); 10 April 1824 NRS 898 2/8283, p. 101
NSWSR 1822, Reel 1977, 2703 [SZ797] 4

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Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 5 December 1810
Crime: Shoplighting
Age: 25
Sentence: 7 years

Ann Walter stole six yards of French cambric worth £3 from Richard Robson, linen draper in Oxford Street. She was caught in the act of tucking the fabric into her mantle and pleaded with Robson: “…She told me she was a person of respectability and assured me it was her first offence”. In fact, on the same day, she was tried for stealing seven yards of cambric six months earlier from Joseph Jolly, linen draper, in Holborn. She wasn’t challenged by Jolly’s assistant at the time because she appeared well born and well dressed, but he followed her out of the store, straight around the corner to the pawnbrokers where she pawned the stolen cambric. The pawnbroker described her as “genteel”. Ann was found not guilty of the Holborn theft, possibly because Jolly was absent from his shop when it happened (and the claim was also suspected to be false), but she was sentenced to seven years’ transportation for the Oxford Street theft.

Ann was the only child of Stephen Walter, coachman to the Marquess of Bath, Sir Thomas Thynne. Ann also worked in Sir Thomas’ household, assisting Lady Bath’s maid as a mantua maker in their house in Grosvenor Square. Letters and petitions pleading for clemency were sent on her behalf by Sir Thomas and the Prince Regent’s librarian, among others. The grounds cited to support her release were her respectable parents; her liberal education; her penitence; that she had a man earning £100 a year “from some of the Public Offices” who was willing to marry her; a person was willing to stand surety for her; and she was not a “hardened criminal”. No mercy was forthcoming. However, Master Ralph of the Friends was directed to supply Walter with “every comfort that may be consistent with her situation” during her voyage by the office of British Undersecretary Robert Peel. Ralph also carried a letter to Governor Macquarie from Peel asking him to provide his protection to Ann, “as a person whose future conduct it is hoped will justify any indulgence which can be properly granted to her”. Macquarie later replied: “I shall shew any degree of indulgence consistent with her situation and shall endeavour to alleviate her sufferings as much as I can with propriety”.

1814 – 1 January, Certificate of Freedom No. 311 issued CF

1814 – Absolute Pardon issued

1814 – 15 January Ann Maria Walter m. James Foster by special licence, St Philips Sydney, Rev. Cowper’s marriage returns CS

1814 – 22 January, Sydney Gazette. “On Saturday last, by special license, at Sydney, Mr James Foster, Principal Clerk to the Judge Advocate, to Miss Walters”.

1814 – Ann M. Walter, on stores, wife of James Foster, Sydney M

1822 – Mary Ann Walters, FBS, wife of James S Foster, CP, Life, Guildford 1812, life, clerk for J Morton M

1834 – 29 July, Sydney Gazette: Died: “Yesterday, Anne Maria, wife of James Foster Esq., Elsecough, Parramatta Road, aged 48”. Residence referred to, correctly, as Elswick in Sydney Herald (31 July) and The Australian (1 August)

James and Ann lived in Castlereagh Street throughout the 1820s until at least October 1829, according to references in the Sydney press, and James – styled as James Foster Esq. – worked in the latter half of the 1820s in the office of prominent solicitor James Norton, who founded the first legal practice in Sydney. From at least mid 1831 James and Ann were living at Elswick, described in the Sydney press as James Foster’s estate. Elswick was a substantial house built on 100 acres on the Parramatta Road in the area today known as Leichhardt. It appears that James sold the property to his employer, Norton, some time in the latter half of 1834, after Ann’s death. James Foster returned to England on the Roslyn Castle in February 1835.

James Foster had been convicted at the Old Bailey in October 1810 of forging a cheque for £103 12 shillings and then trying to get a porter at the White Horse Inn, Fetter Lane, where he lodged, to cash it. He was sentenced to death and mercy was recommended “on account of his family”. The court record showed him as Forster but The Morning Post referred to him as Foster in its account of his trial: “…he is a very genteel looking young man, was dressed in black, and seemed very much affected. He held his handkerchief to his face all the time. It is said he denies himself all sustenance ever since he had been committed”. Remarks in the Criminal Register stated “he has been in custody before for like offence”. James’ sentence was commuted to transportation for life. His ship, the Guildford, arrived in Sydney on 18 January 1812. On 28 January he was issued Ticket of Leave 9/513.

Sources:
Old Bailey 5 December 1810 (1)
Old Bailey 5 December 1810 (2)
James Forster stet: Old Bailey 31 October 1810
The National Archives, Kew, England, HO 47/46/9
Historical Records of Australia, Vol. 7, 14 March 1811, p. 353; 18 October 1811, pp. 447-448
James Foster: The Morning Post, London, 16 October, 1810, p. 1; Sydney Monitor, 13 August 1831; Sydney Gazette, 24 February 1835
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1814, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024

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Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Betty Ward

Elizabeth does not appear on the Transportation Register or Indents for the Friends. However, throughout the NSW convict records, the vessel is shown alongside her name. Her name does not appear on the transportation register of any other vessel in the relevant timeframe, hence it must be assumed she did travel on the Friends and the omission of her name was an error.

Convicted: Lent Assizes, Chester 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: 16
Sentence: 7 years

Elizabeth, who was also known as Betty, was a cotton-piecer from Stockport.  She was arrested with Mary Arden, a 19-year old cotton-reeler from Congleton, and convicted of stealing five pairs of blankets belonging to James Crabtree.

Possible baptism:  Betty Ward, born 28 July 1793, baptised 18 August 1793 at St Mary, Stockport; parents William and Betty Ward

1812 – 22 May, Elizabeth Ward m. George Bates, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Robert Cartwright’s marriage returns CS

1814 – Convict, off stores, wife to G Bate, Liverpool; George Bate, off stores, Mary, sawyer, Liverpool M

1815 – 17 June, Sydney Gazette: “WHEREAS my Wife, Elizabeth Bates, absented herself from her Home on Saturday the 10th instant; this is to Caution the Public against Crediting her on my Account, as I will not be answerable for any Debts she may contract. George Bates”

1822 – Eleana Bates, alias Ward, FBS, married to G Bates, Appian M

1825 – Elizabeth Ward, wife of G Bates, Appian M

1828 – Eliz Bate aged 35, FBS married to George Bate, aged 48, Mary 1809, came free, tenant Illawarra CEN

1839 – Elizabeth Bates died aged 42 NSWBDM

Sources:
Baptism:  www.ancestry.com
Chester Chronicle, 13 April 1810, p. 3
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 30 June 1812, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Newcastle Upon Tyne Quarter Sessions, 2 May 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 35
Sentence: 7 years

Ann was convicted at the same sessions as Elizabeth Thompson, who also travelled on the Friends.

1814 – Convict, on stores, Factory, Parramatta M

1815 – 31 August, Ann Waddle died aged 40, St Johns, Parramatta, Rev. Samuel Marsden burial returns CS

Ann still appeared (incorrectly) in the convict lists in 1820.

Source:
CS: Burial return for quarter ended 30 September 1815, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, Old Bailey, London, 9 January 1811
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 29
Sentence: 7 years

Mary Ann was servant for only 10 days to Daniel Lawrence, publican at the Golden Lion in Lemon Street, Goldfields. She left after he had given her a warning. A few days later he found she had taken 10 yards of table linen. Mary Ann pawned it at several pawnbrokers, obtaining four shillings for one piece and 10 shillings for another. The value of the stolen linen in court was given as 18 shillings. Mary Ann told the court she had two small children without a father.

It is not known if any children travelled with her on the Friends.

1815 – 20 September, Mary Welch, aged 35, died, buried 22 September, St Philips, Sydney, Rev. William Cowper’s burial returns CS

Mary Ann’s death year is recorded as 1814 in NSWBDM. She still appears as Mary Walsh in the convict lists (incorrectly) in 1821.

Sources:
Old Bailey 9 January 1811
CS: Burial return for quarter ended 30 September 1815, St Philips, Sydney, NRS 898, Reel 6024

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Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Kent Assizes, Canterbury, 20 August 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: About 20
Sentence: 7 years

1812 – 20 January Maria White m. George Mitchell, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns CS

1814 – 10 March, Maria White and George Mitchell both on list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle per Mary, three years, convicted: 26 February CS

1825 – Maria Mitchell, FBS, wife of George Mitchell, CP, Coromandel 1804, life, settler, Newcastle; Sons James born 1821 and George born 1824 M

1825 – Maria appears twice in the 1825 muster: Maria White, FBS, settler, Newcastle; Son James 4 M

1827 – 7 December, Certificate of Freedom No. 27/1065 issued CF

1828 – Maria Mitchell aged 38, FBS, married to George Mitchell aged 33, CP, Coromandel 1804, life, Pittamee, Wallis Plains, 160 acres and 70 cattle; Children: James aged 7, George aged 4, John aged 2 CEN

1835 – 7 December, Maria died, Maitland, buried at Glebe Cemetery

According to family history sites, another son, William Goldingham Mitchell, was born in Maitland on 12 January 1832. Maria’s husband, George Mitchell, was born about 1770. The age recorded for him in the 1828 Census was incorrect. Soon after being sent to Newcastle penal settlement in 1814 George was appointed a constable there. In mid 1818, well past the expiration of his three-year sentence, he wrote to the colonial administration asking for his emancipation. He was given 30 acres at Wallis Plains, inland from Newcastle (now the Maitland district) in October 1818. George was issued an Absolute Pardon on 28 November 1821 that showed his native place was Staplehurst, Kent, and his trade was a smith. George died in 1850, aged 80.

Sources:
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1812, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898, Reel 6024; 10 March 1814, NRS 937 4/3493, p. 86; 30 July 1818, NRS 900 4/1855, p. 186; 1823, NRS 899 4/1835A 206 pp. 305-6
Family history site (1)
Family history site (2)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Nee Sheerwood, Alias Hannah Smith

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, 11 April 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: 30
Sentence: 7 years

The court record noted the alias of Hannah Smith.

Hannah Whitelock lodged with her husband Samuel in the garrett of a house at 30 East Smithfield, belonging to milkman Patrick Mulcahy. Hannah, with the help of a soldier lodging in the next room, had cut off some of the lead guttering from the roof and sold it. She had got 5 shillings 9p on one occasion and 1 shilling 3p on another. Her husband apparently knew nothing about it, and one day both he and Hannah complained to the landlord that their room was floating in water. The landlord saw that the guttering had been cut, called a magistrate and found some of the guttering hidden among the bed clothes. Both Hannah and Samuel were arrested but only Whitelock was convicted when she protested her husband’s innocence.

Hannah Blake Sheerwood, daughter of John and Mary Sheerwood was baptised May 1782 at St Marys, Newington. Hannah Shearwood married Samuel Whitelock on 13 February 1804 at Southwark St Saviour. Both signed the register with a x.

William Whitelock, son of Samuel and Hannah was baptised on 22 December 1802 at St Botolphs, Aldgate. He did not accompany Hannah on the Friends. 

1814 – Convict, on stores, Factory, Parramatta, 1 child M

1819 – Factory, Parramatta 3 children, on stores M

1822 – Hannah Whitlock, wife of Wm Hubbard, Sydney; William Hubbard, FBS, constable, Sydney; Children: Mary aged 7, John aged 5, James aged 3, William aged 2 M

1825 – FBS, wife of Wm Hubbard, Sydney; William Hubbard, FS, constable, Sydney; Son William aged 5, born colony M

1828 – Hannah Whitlock alias Hubbard, aged 45, FBS, wife of William Hubbard, aged 57, FBS , Scarborough 1788, 7 yrs, waterman, Harrington Street; Son William aged 9 CEN

The father of Hannah’s older children, Mary, John and James, is not known. It is also not known if William Hubbard was the father of the youngest child William. According to a family history site, Hannah did not live with William Hubbard until some time after the death of his wife Mary Goulding in September 1820, and Hannah and William did not marry. William Hubbard died 18th May 1843 aged 76, Sydney Benevolent Asylum.

It’s possible that Hannah’s son William from her marriage in England became a jeweller in Clerkenwell. (1841 UK Census).

Sources:
Baptism and marriage, England: www.ancestry.com
Old Bailey 11 April 1810
www.firstfleet.org.au

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, 6 June 1810
Crime: Shoplifting
Age: 38
Sentence: 7 years

Emanuel Thorley, linen draper at Red Lion Street, Holborn, was immediately suspicious of Eleanor when she came in and asked to see some prints for a child’s frock. He told her he would not show her anything. Another shopkeeper who had been keeping an eye on her entered the shop just as Eleanor reached for some muslin on the counter and hid it under her coat. The other shopkeeper saw her take it. She was arrested and convicted of the theft of four yards of muslin valued at 9 shillings.

The Criminal Register notes she had been convicted two years earlier. In early 1806, a woman by the name of Eleanor Williams, 28, was convicted of stealing a pair of stays from a pawnbroker’s shop in Drury Lane. She was fined 1s and sentenced to the House of Correction for six months. In September 1809, Eleanor Williams, 35, was convicted with two other women of taking some handkerchiefs and a hat from the passageway of an old clothes dealer. She was fined 1s and sentenced to the House of Correction for six months. They may all have been the same person, regardless of the ages given.

1814 – Convict, on stores, Factory, Parramatta M

1815 – 4 July, Eleanor Williams, aged 33, m. John Webb, aged 30, Gambier, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS

1819 – Elen Williams, (with) John Webb; 2 children, off stores M

Eleanor appears on the convict lists until 1820 as Ellen Williams. She cannot be located within the musters or 1828 Census.

1848 – Ellenor Webb died NSWBDM

It is unclear who John Webb was. He does not appear under that name on the registers of either voyage of the Admiral Gambier. However, a man named as John Webb, of the Admiral Gambier, was assigned to T.E. Forbes of Sydney in 1823, and in 1825 he was shown in government employ, serving a transportation sentence of 14 years.

Sources:
Old Bailey 15 January 1806
Old Bailey 20 September 1809
Old Bailey 6 June 1810
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 July 1815, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898, Reel 6024

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Also known as Mary Potter

Convicted: Liberty of St Albans Quarter Sessions, Hertfordshire, 3 May 1810
Crime: Receiving stolen goods
Age: About 23
Sentence: 14 years

Mary was convicted with Mary Taylor, both of Elstree, of stealing a wooden box from the Friendly Society which contained two club books and £12 in notes, belonging to John Drinkwater, William Howell, and James and Robert Pepler, from the Plough Inn, Elstree. Both women were sentenced to transportation and travelled on the Friends.

Mary travelled on the Friends with her daughter Elizabeth. Family websites suggest Mary was married to William Wilmot and that Elizabeth was born in May 1811 in Hertfordshire but the latter at least was not possible given that the Friends left England in early April 1811. Mary’s maiden name was Potter. See Elizabeth Brown

A possible first marriage:

1803 – 19 July, Mary Potter m. George Willmot, Combe St Nicholas, Somerset

1813 – 27 August, Mary Wilmott, permission granted to marry Daniel Brown, Guildford, at Windsor CS

1813 – 30 August, Mary Wilmot m. Daniel Brown, St Matthews, Windsor, Rev. Cartwright’s marriage returns CS

1814 – Convict, off stores, Windsor, wife to Daniel Brown, Guildford, on stores, town gang; 2 children off stores M

1814 – Daughter Lucy born

1815 – Daughter Mary A born

1819 – Convict, off stores, (with) D. Brown, free; 4 children off stores M

1822 – FBS wife of D Brown, Windsor; 5 children M

1825 – Wife of Dan Brown Windsor M

1828 – Mary Browne aged 41, FBS, Daniel Browne aged 46, CP, Guildford 1812, Farmer Cornwallis, 50 acres, 45 cattle; Children: Mary A aged 11, Ann aged 10, Martha aged 6, David aged 7, Emma aged 4, all born colony CEN

1832 – 3 November, Mary died

According to a family history site, the children of Mary and Daniel were: Lucy, born 16 May, 1814; Mary Ann born 25 March, 1815; Ann born 26 October 1818; David born 17 December 1820; Martha born 26 October 1822 and Emma born 6 July 1824, all born Windsor.

In 1822, Daniel Brown, then working as a bricklayer in Windsor, requested that his wife’s brother Richard Potter be released from Stephen Woodcock’s road gang, near Campbelltown, and assigned to him as his government servant, and this was approved. Richard had been convicted of burglary in Kingston Surrey (22 miles from Elstree) and sentenced to death, then commuted to transportation for life. Potter had been transported on the first voyage of the Admiral Gambier, arriving in NSW in 1808. Potter remained assigned to his sister and her family for several years. At the end of 1825, Daniel who already had a grant of 30 acres at Windsor, was granted a further 270 acres. However, he was shown as still holding 50 acres in the 1828 Census.

Sources:
Ken Griffen, Transported beyond the Seas, Hertfordshire Family History Society
www.rootschat.com
CS: 27 August 1813, NRS 935 4/3491 p. 539; Marriage return for quarter ended 30 September 1813, St Matthews, Windsor, NRS 898, Reel 6024; Richard Potter: 16 February 1822, NRS 897 4/1756, pp. 82-83; June 1825, NRS 900 4/1875 p. 183; Land grant: 9 December 1825, NRS 937 4/3516 p. 142
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Middlesex Gaol Delivery, 11 April 1810
Crime: Grand larceny
Age: given as 30
Sentence: 7 years

Mary stole 20 yards of printed cotton from John Davis/Davies, linen draper, Castle Street, Leicester Square. The shop man saw her take the cloth and draw it up under her clothes through the inside of her pocket. He waited until she went out of the shop and then apprehended her. The cloth was valued at 30 shillings.

A note in the Criminal Register said she had been in Newgate before. In 1808, a woman by the name of Mary Wilson was convicted of stealing 12 pairs of cotton stockings from a shop in Whitechapel. She mentioned she had a child. She was fined 1s and sentenced to six months in the House of Correction. It is possible – given the escalating prison term – she was also the Mary Wilson in another court appearance in 1809, age given as 26, where she was found guilty of stealing an apron, a tablecloth and a pair of snuffers from a publican in Sampson’s Gardens, earning another fine of 1s and one year in the House of Correction.

Mary travelled on the Friends with her infant son William. See William Wilson

1812 – 8 February, Sydney Gazette, “Absconded from the Public Factory at Parramatta, Mary Wilson, having left an infant Child. She arrived in the Friends, and is supposed to be in the Sydney area. Any Person harbouring or concealing her will be prosecuted, according to Law”.

1820 – FBS, (with) J. Mc Guire, Richmond; 2 boys and 2 girls M

1822 – FBS , wife of J. McGuire, 2 children, born colony M

1825 – FBS, living with J. McGuire Richmond; Children: William Wilson, came free, Mary aged 11 born colony and Margaret, aged 9, born colony (see below) M

1828 – Margaret Rule aka Margaret Wilson, aged 45, FBS ; John Rule, aged 32, FBS, Lord Eldon 1817, North Richmond, Protestant, 15 acres; No children listed CEN

1852 – 24 April, Mary died

According to family history websites, Mary lived with James McGuire, an Irishman and weaver by trade who came from Monaghan. His age was given as 20 when he was sentenced to life in 1800. He arrived in NSW on the Rolla in 1803 and received a Conditional Pardon in January 1814. Mary had two children to James: Mary born in 1814 and Margaret born in 1815. At the time of the 1828 Census both girls were living with their father on a 50-acre property, while Mary was living with John Rule. When James died he left his property, Rock Valley Farm, Richmond, to his son George from an earlier marriage.

In the 1825 muster, a number of additional Wilson children are shown under Mary’s name but family history sites do not include these among Mary’s children: Master L. Wilson, aged 13, born colony, employed by Mr Lord, Sydney; Charles, aged 14, born colony, at school Parramatta; Peter aged 11, came free, at school Parramatta.

Sources:
Old Bailey 17 February 1808
Old Bailey 12 April 1809
Old Bailey 11 April 1810
Family history site (1)
Family history site (2)

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Cumberland Quarter Sessions, 2 May 1810
Crime: Petit larceny
Age: unknown
Sentence: 7 years

Sarah was tried with Sarah Wilkinson, singlewoman, of St Bees on three counts of theft. She was found guilty of the charge of stealing several items of wearing apparel belonging to Martha Marsden, including four waistcoats, two gowns, one pair of breeches and a pair of pantaloons. She was also found guilty of the theft of a silver watch from John Macalister. She was found not guilty of the theft of 30 yards of linen cloth. Sarah was the wife of Thomas Wilson, a labourer from the Parish of St Bees, and was described in the Carlisle Journal as coming from the House of Correction at Whitehaven.

Sarah Graham, Elizabeth Jones and Jane Dixon, also on the Friends, were convicted at the same sessions.

NSW:

1812 – 2 February Mary Wilson m. Patrick Annratty, St Johns Parramatta, Rev. Marsden’s marriage returns CS Recorded as Patrick Hanratty in NSWBD

1814 – Convict, off stores, wife to P Anaratty , Parramatta; Patrick Anaratty, Atlas 1, carpenter, free M

1817 – 14 June, Sydney Gazette, Sarah Wilson proceeding to the Derwent (VDL) in the Henrietta requests all claims may be presented

Van Diemen’s Land:

1821 – 2 August, wife of T. Young, charged with being drunk and disorderly, fined 5 shillings

1827 – 17 September, drunk and disorderly during divine service yesterday, to be sent to House of Correction for 14 days

1828 – 1 July, FBS, drunk and disorderly, House of Correction for 28 days

1830 – 18 March, FBS, drunkenness, placed four hours in the stocks

1830 – 23 March, FBS, drunkenness, fined 5 shillings or to be placed in stocks for four hours

1830 – 23 April, FBS, being drunk and found on the premises of William Athorn in Liverpool Street at an unseasonable hour and unable to give a proper account of herself. Ordered to find sureties for her good behaviour for three months.

Eight more convictions between 1828 and 1830 for being drunk and disorderly with similar sentences.

1830 – 21 August, FBS, arrested for stealing 3 dishes, value 4 shillings in the dwelling house of John Voltaire Roberts in Hobart Town on 3 August; also one pair of trowers, value £1 , from the house of Robert Mathers, committed to trial

1830 – 27 September, sentenced to 7 years’ transportation. The Judge wrote: “She appears to be rather above the middle age and is a most drunken disorderly character”.

1832 – 10 December, convicted for exhibiting a false pass at the police office, sent to the Factory for six months

1833 – 5 November, charged with absence for a week without leave, sent to the Factory for three months and assigned to the Interior

1834 – 5 December, charged with being drunk and out after hours, 10 days’ solitary confinement on bread and water

1835 – 1 May, charged with absence without leave and drunk, seven days’ solitary confinement on bread and water

1835 – 1 June, charged with absence without leave, reprimanded

1835 – Assigned to Mr W. Harrison M

1841 – 16 August, arrested for larceny and committed for trial.

1841 – 31 August, Launceston Quarter Sessions, trans-shipped for stealing stays, property of James Reid, widower

Sarah appears to have left Patrick Annratty/Hanratty when she went to the Derwent in mid 1817. The woman he would then bigamously marry arrived in the colony on the Lord Melville in February of that year with her young daughter. Patrick married Sarah Primer, a convict, on 19 March 1821. (Rev. Samuel Marsden’s marriage returns, Parramatta). Patrick was from Drogheda, County Louth and had been convicted for the theft of flax worth 3 or 4 shillings.

Sources:
Cumbria Archives: Easter Sessions 1810, Carlisle, CQ1, CQ3/3 session papers, indictiments
Cumberland Pacquet, 15 May 1810, p. 3
CS: Marriage return for quarter ended 31 March 1812, St Johns, Parramatta, NRS 898, Reel 6024
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)
Archives of Tasmania, CON 40/1/10

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: High Court of Justiciary, Edinburgh, 25 January 1809
Crime: Plagium (theft of an infant)
Age: Given as “above” 18
Sentence: Death later commuted to transportation for life, to enact herself to the contractor or his assignee for seven years
Native place: Glasdrumman, County Down, Ireland

Rachel was convicted of kidnapping a child. She claimed she had come across from Ireland to Scotland in search of an aunt and uncle about May 1808. She found her way to Glasgow where she stayed about a week in early July but could not find her family. Instead, she abducted a three-year child and make an attempt to take her back with her to Ireland, intending to bring her up as her own. However, the little girl, Flora Amos, was already the much-loved daughter of a Glasgow shoemaker. Wright was overtaken on the road at the Prestwick Toll Bar and the child was recovered unharmed.

Wright was charged with plagium (theft of an infant). The rarity of the crime was noted by the High Court of the Justiciary in Edinburgh when Wright was tried in January 1809 and several judges were called on to deliberate on an appropriate verdict. They eventually agreed a verdict of death by public hanging, but it was later commuted to transportation for life.

Van Diemen’s Land:

1812 – July, arrived at Port Dalrymple (Launceston, VDL) on the Lady Nelson, remarks: “indifferent”

1819 – At Port Dalrymple

1820 – At Port Dalrymple

1821 – At Port Dalrymple

1823 – At Launceston

1830 – 20 April, wife of Quin, charged with being drunk and disorderly on the street. Returned to the service of government, to Factory at George Town

1831 – 28 February, charged with insolence and drunkenness, sentenced to 6 weeks in Female House of Correction

1832 – Wife of James Quinn

1833 – Assigned to her husband

1833 – House of Correction

1835 – Assigned to her husband

1835 – 7 December, charged with offending again decency by the exposure of her person, fined £10

Between 1827 and 1837, Rachel was charged on 22 other occasions with being drunk and/or disorderly. She was variously reprimanded, fined, placed in the stocks, to find sureties and sent to gaol (twice) for up to 28 days.

1841 – Married

1845 – 25 February, issued ToL

1848 – 16 August, Rachael Wright died at Hobart aged 55 years, free, pauper, cause of death: disease of the brain

Rachel had three children according to a family history website: Jane Quin, born 18 January 1816; Frances Quin, born 25 June 1817 and John Quin born c. May 1819.

Her husband was Thomas Quinn, not James as shown in the 1832 muster. He had been convicted of burglary at the Old Bailey in February 1807 and sentenced to death, which was later commuted to transportation for life. He voyaged to NSW on the Admiral Gambier in 1808.

The death shown above is thought to be Rachel even though in October 1853 her ticket of leave was revoked because she did not report to the police office.

Sources:
National Archives of Scotland: Edinburgh Court of Judiciary, 25 January 1809, High Court Minute Book JC13/36, High Court Case papers JC26/337, and Book of Adjournal entries JC4/4
The Scot Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, Vol 71, 1809, p. 156; The Derby Mercury, 23 February 1809, p. 2; Caledonian Mercury, 20 March 1809, p. 3
Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls, Phillip Tardif, 1990 and 2006 (containing Information from the Tasmanian State Archives)
Conduct record Tasmanian State Archives
Family history site

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.

Convicted: Suffolk Assizes, 16 August 1810
Crime: Larceny
Age: about 36
Sentence: 7 years

Susan was convicted of the theft of three £1 notes of the Bank England from the dwelling house of John Garrod of Leiston. After her conviction, she remained in the Ipswich county gaol until 19 February 1811 when she was removed and taken to board the Friends at Woolwich.

1813 – Daughter Elizabeth Wyatt born to Susannah NSWBDM

1814 – Susanah (also Susan) Wyard, convict, off stores, Windsor, convict, off stores, lives with W. Shaw; 1 child, off stores M

1816 – Daughter Eliza born to Susannah and Ben Wright NSWBDM

1820 – FBS, (with) Ben Wright, Richmond; 1 daughter M

1822 – FBS, wife of Ben Wright, TL, Indian, life, labourer, Windsor M

1825 – Wife of Ben Wright, Windsor ; Daughter Eliza aged 9 M

1828 – Susannah Wright, aged 54, FBS, Benjamin Wright aged 45, CP, Indian 1810, farmer, North Richmond, Protestant, 32 ½ acres; Daughter Eliza aged 11, born colony CEN

1852 – Susan Wright died aged 77 NSWBDM

Susan’s first partner in the colony was probably William Shaw, of Hawkesbury, who died in Windsor in 1815. NSWBDM

Elizabeth Wyatt was at the female orphan school in Parramatta in 1822 and in 1825 aged 11 with her mother named as Susannah. There was no other Susannah Wyatt in NSW in 1813 who could have been her mother. In 1835, Elizabeth Wyatt married Charles Hannington at St Johns, Parramatta. NSWBDM

Benjamin Wright had been convicted at the Lent Assizes in Suffolk in 1808 for housebreaking and sentenced to death, which was later commuted to transportation for life. He received his conditional pardon on 19 September 1825, which gave his birth year as 1786. CR CP

Sources:
Bury and Norwich Post, 22 August 1810 (provided by Suffolk County Record Office)
Ipswich Journal, 23 February 1811
William Shaw: CS 24 July 1813, NRS 897 4/1728, p. 156

See here for abbreviations used for references.

Where the references NSWBDM or CS do not appear by entries for births, deaths and marriages, it means they have been sourced from the family history websites noted for each woman and may not be confirmed.